Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.
If you’ve decided keto is a good fit for your wellness goals, and you want to add fruit to your meal plan, choose fruits with the least amount of net carbs, which is the total amount of carbohydrate content in a fruit minus its fiber content (since the body can’t digest fiber), according to the website for the popular low-carb diet Atkins. The keto diet allows for about 25 g of net carbs per day, per the healthy-lifestyle website Ruled.me. Dietitians recommend reaching for the following.
Thank you, Erica. Sorry, mascarpone won’t work in a baked cheesecake – it melts into a butter-like consistency when heated. Also, just so you know, mascarpone does not have 0 carbs. Manufacturers get away with writing 0 because they can round down if it’s less than 1 gram per serving. Mascarpone has 0.3 grams carbs per tablespoon, and cream cheese has 0.8 grams per tablespoon.
How can you promise that when everything seems to need to be handmade? That is either a major time commitment, shopping, prepping, cooking, cleaning, or the most basic-bland thing ever. This would all be very good for me, but I don’t see how it is feasibly sustainable. Everyone seems to say things like ‘oh it only takes an hour’. All I can think is, wow you have an hour for this every meal? That and I live by myself and fresh food goes bad quickly, that gets really expensive really quickly or requires that you go to the store every other day. I really want to do this long term, but please, how is it realistically possible? I don’t want every meal to mean that I have to clean a pot, a pan, 2 knives, a stirring spoon, a cutting board, etc etc.

Overall, nuts can be an amazing addition to a healthy diet and can be a convenient snack, helping you stay full for longer periods of time and providing you with essential micronutrients. Because of their caloric density, they should be consumed in moderation and properly measured, and if you notice that they’re stalling you, you might want to limit them for a while.
So up through the ’90s, the thinking went: “Fats are bad and carbs are fine.” This began to change with the Atkins diet, which rose to fame at the end of the decade as a quick-fix way to lose lots of weight. According to the wisdom of Dr. Robert Atkins, carbs were actually bad and fats were actually fine. His logic led my grandpa to eat pork rinds for a year. It also caused a plunge in the sale of bread and brought difficult times to doughnut seller Krispy Kreme.
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV). 
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