Yogurt is full of carbs so it would be better to eat a carbmaster like Kroger sells if you want to eat yogurt. Yes it is low fat but I like to add whipping cream for the extra good fat. Also, KETO is not a DIET! It is a way of eating. You will eat this way from now on. There is no eating KETO, then going back to regular way of eating. Your regular way got you in the mess in the first place. Once you go real KETO, it’s with you forever.
Consuming a higher amount of fat is important on a ketogenic diet, and getting a variety of different fats is recommended.  I often get asked about potential snacks that someone can consume on the go.  As a source of primarily unsaturated (polyunsaturated and monounsaturated) fats, nuts and seeds can be a great choice to include in your daily menu.
You may need to trial a few kinds of cheese to find the best one that will bake to a crispy shell, and each one will vary considerably. I used a regular block of cheese, shredded/grated it, then cooked until I knew it would be crispy when cooled down. The first ones I tried when I was developing this, I discovered I hadn’t cooked them long enough to crisp up.
If you’re one of the lucky people that have a dehydrator, you can take serious advantage of it by dehydrating thin slices of vegetables overnight (normally 12 hours) to get crisp, perfect vegetables that you can eat as snacks. Do this with zucchini, radish, or jicama. If you’re not lucky enough to have a dehydrator (like me), then you can easily make cheese chips in the oven and flavor them with your own spices!
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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