There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.


Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.

Being rich in healthy oils makes these nuts particularly good for cardiovascular health [12]. Studies on macadamia oil show that it reduces inflammation and shrinks the size of fat cells [13]. This is helpful for people with obesity as inflammation and enlarged fat cells both make the disorder difficult to manage. Besides a perfect macros profile, macadamia nuts are also a good source of B vitamins, iron, manganese, and zinc.
Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.

By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
This looks awesome and I’m going to try it. I’ve been doing “keto” since before it was called that. I fell off the wagon several years ago but have recently come back to the fold as it’s the only way of eating that works for me. Anyway I wanted to mention that when my kids were growing up I made yogurt often. And then when I started low carbing I decided to try making it with heavy cream and it worked! And it’s amazing. Obviously more work than this but try it!
When I first started making homemade, low-carb yogurt, it really surprised me that you can use yogurt to make yogurt! Just add some yogurt to the milk and the magic will happen! Once the yogurt is made, strain through a cloth to achieve thick, Greek-style creamy goodness that you can eat straight or serve with some fruit for a healthy and delicious breakfast.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)

Meat supplies a whole range of nutrients – including nutrients like vitamin B12 that you can’t get anywhere else. It’s also a key source of protein for keto diets. At the very minimum, humans need to eat enough protein to repair our muscles and do all the other important stuff that protein does. So “enough meat” means enough to serve as a primary protein source and round out your diet with essential nutrients that are mainly or only found in meat.
Rich in gut-happy bacteria, yogurt is a great way to add a little sweetness to a Keto diet. Although you can find Greek or low carb coconut yogurts on many grocery store shelves, why not get creative and make your own? It’s easy as pie and delicious homemade yogurt will be a fabulous addition to the recipes featured on our list of top Keto-friendly yogurt dishes!
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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