Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!


To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.
Just one area of concern for your Australian readers is advocating consumption of palm oil- 87% of world consumption is sourced by our nearby neighbours via deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia- the equivalent 0f 300 football fields is cleared every hour. The near extinct Sumatran Orangutan will be forever in your debt if it is removed from the list.
A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok.
Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.

Hi Dee Dee, It’s supposed to be jiggly in the middle when you take it out. It firms up as it cools and then when it chills in the fridge. I haven’t experienced cracking with it but the cause doesn’t have to do with being not done, it’s sudden temperature changes. If you want to be on the safe side you can bake it in a water bath next time. I hope you still loved the taste!
You can receive the FULL benefit of the 3-Week Ketogenic Diet without adding any exercise during the 3-weeks you'll be following the plan. If you choose to incorporate at least an hour of metabolic exercise during the week using my personal-trainer guided exercise videos, you'll see up to THREE times the results. Exercise contributes to hormonal balance, blood sugar stability, and lean muscle growth.

Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance.  Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis.  One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods.  So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy.  Here are 22 ketogenic foods that you will LOVE!


Potential Health Benefits: Improvements in lipid profile. In one study, people with mildly elevated cholesterol consumed 30 grams (1 ounce) of hazelnuts for 4 weeks. By the end of the study, they had significant reductions in total cholesterol and cholesterol: HDL ratio. In addition, they experienced a significant decrease in apo-B, reflecting a reduction in their LDL particle number (16).


Thank you, Ashlee! To keep the texture the same, use lemon zest or lemon extract. Lemon juice isn’t potent enough and you’d need so much that the texture would change. I haven’t tested the amount of lemon zest or extract yet, but I’d try about a tablespoon of zest or 1 1/2 tsp of extract. You can add it before adding the eggs and taste (since there are no raw ingredients before adding eggs). Just keep in mind that at that stage you’ll want it more potent than the end result, since the eggs will dilute it a little. Let me know how it goes!
Animal proteins (meat, fish, etc.) have very little, if any, carbs. You can consume them in moderate amounts as needed to control hunger. Overall, choose fattier cuts of meat rather than leaner ones. For example, chicken thighs and legs are preferable to chicken breasts because they contain much more fat. We’ve got quick keto diet chicken recipes to help.
Keep in mind that, although there are plenty of keto-friendly fruit options out there, consumption of fruit on the keto diet should still be limited. Even on a modified keto diet, it’s recommended to aim for around 30–50 grams of net carbs per day to maintain ketosis and maximize results. Even one or two servings of these low-carb fruits can knock out a good chunk of your daily carb allotment in one shot, effectively kicking you out ketosis.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.
FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets! And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar!
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
I’ve made this before for my husband’s birthday a few weeks ago and it was a huge hit! I’m wanting to make it again but realized that I’m out of vanilla extract for this time around. I have coffee, lemon, cinnamon, and peppermint extracts. What would you recommend as a vanilla extract substitute? I’m out of almond extract too.. How much to use also?
Peanuts are technically a legume, not a nut. However, I find them to be a delicious keto snack, especially peanut butter. Peanut butter is one of the easiest things for me to overconsume, personally. The carb count of peanuts is on the higher end, so it’s important to watch the serving size if your goal is to stick to keto. My suggestion is to always measure out a serving of peanuts or peanut butter before consuming.
Here’s a nutritional list of some of the more commonly consumed vegetables on keto. Keep in mind that the weights are the same of everything listed so that it will impact the skew of the carb counts. For example, in a meal you may have 6 oz. of broccoli in the side, but you would not have 6 oz. worth of berries in the morning. You may mix 6 oz. of berries into a pudding with 4 servings.
While this roasted seaweed snack doesn’t pack in as much fat as many of the other picks on our list, we think it’s worth adding to your keto shopping cart. It’s low in calories, sodium, and has an impressive zero net carbs thanks to the fiber. Plus, the dried sea veggie is filled with fat-soluble vitamins and minerals such as iron, manganese, and copper to maintain overall health.
As for all the other nutrients in meat? If you’re eating enough meat to get your protein, you’ll probably get enough of those, too. For example, that 4 ounces of chuck roast contains 113% of the RDA for vitamin B12, plus substantial amounts of other B vitamins, like choline. For people without special nutritional needs, it’s just not necessary to worry about it beyond that.
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Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.

If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
Well, if you’ve been on the keto train for a while or just recently got your ticket punched then you know that this is a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In 2013, the European Journal of Nutrition study results showed the risk of obesity was not associated with high-fat dairy consumption (2). And a study done in 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality was not caused by increased circulation of dairy fatty acids in the body (2). Now we know that cottage cheese is not the cause of your body looking like cottage cheese or your heart turning into it.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.

In contrast, the Atkins diet is a low-carbohydrate diet that allows you to eat more protein and carbs than the ketogenic diet, while paleo diets focus on selecting foods that were consumed before farming became popular and don't necessarily restrict your carb intake. In general, people adhering to ketogenic diets consume only between 20 and 50 grams of carbohydrates per day.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.

Overall, nuts can be an amazing addition to a healthy diet and can be a convenient snack, helping you stay full for longer periods of time and providing you with essential micronutrients. Because of their caloric density, they should be consumed in moderation and properly measured, and if you notice that they’re stalling you, you might want to limit them for a while.


Yogurt is full of carbs so it would be better to eat a carbmaster like Kroger sells if you want to eat yogurt. Yes it is low fat but I like to add whipping cream for the extra good fat. Also, KETO is not a DIET! It is a way of eating. You will eat this way from now on. There is no eating KETO, then going back to regular way of eating. Your regular way got you in the mess in the first place. Once you go real KETO, it’s with you forever.

How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.
All grains, even whole meal (wheat, rye, oats, corn, barley, millet, bulgur, sorghum, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, sprouted grains), quinoa and white potatoes. this includes all products made from grains (pasta, bread, pizza, cookies, crackers, etc.) sugar and sweets (table sugar, HFCS, agave syrup, ice creams, cakes, sweet puddings and sugary soft-drinks).
Processed meats, like hot dogs, deli meat and sausages, typically contain sulfites. “Sulfites are not healthy for anyone, they are carcinogenic and may be harmful to people with respiratory disorders,” Hunnes says. “Also, processed meats are carcinogenic (class I) according to the World Health Organization.” Beyond that, sulfites can cause certain vitamins — like folate, thiamine, and nicotinamide — in your food to break down more rapidly and you miss out on those nutrients.[8] Thiamine[9]and nicotinamide[10] have been shown to have powerful neuroprotective properties, and folic acid helps with DNA production. So, yeah, pretty important stuff.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
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