Nuts are a great source of fat, and can be a great keto snack. However, it is easy to go overboard. Most nuts are calorically dense, so they can be easy to over-consume. On more than one occasion, I have found myself sitting next to the jar of nuts and “just having a few more”. Before I was aware, I had probably consumed 800 extra calories of nuts! Depending on your goals, consuming nuts in excess can hinder your progress. That’s not to say that nuts are off limits, though. Instead, portion out single servings beforehand. Avoid sitting down with the entire container. This goes for every other snack, but I feel that nuts are one of the easiest things to overeat.
Michelle, I second Libby’s remarks about “The fear of saturated fat is so old fashioned and outdated. Research shows saturated fat is healthy, stable and protective.”. In addition to her link, get a used copy (or new) of Nora Gedgaudas’s book Primal Body Primal Mind. Dr. Eric Berg has put out many youtube videos about Keto and intermittent fasting. Search his name with weight, or keto, or intermittent fasting, or phytic acid. They are some interesting videos.
Just when you thought your midnight-snacking of shredded cheese could be considered a healthy habit thanks to keto… (You kid, you knew it was too good to be true all along.) Cheese in general is not recommended on clean keto or the Bulletproof Diet. Dairy proteins are among the worst offenders for allergies and inflammation. If your body doesn’t like casein, your immune system will attack every time you eat it. The reaction may be subtle and chronic, or it could trigger an autoimmune flare-up and other inflammatory conditions. Cheese also harbors tons of toxic mold from the animal’s diet.[11]
Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you.
Some people believe that it's dangerous when your body enters ketosis. However, it's important to understand the difference between ketosis, which is nutritionally safe, and ketoacidosis, which is caused by a lack of insulin and can increase blood sugar significantly. The ketogenic diet keeps the body in ketosis, not ketoacidosis. It's still important to monitor your ketone levels and consult with your doctor before embarking on this diet, since ketoacidosis is a serious medical issue.
If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)

It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.


Many people choose ketoproof coffee or tea in the morning to ramp up energy with added fats. While it is a great thing, it’s also important to consume flavored beverages in moderation. This is amplified when it comes to caffeine as too much will lead to weight loss stalls; try to limit yourself to a maximum of 2 cups of caffeinated beverages a day.

The official USDA database lists cream cheese as 1.56g of carbs per ounce. Some product labels may round this up or down, but it's actually the same for any full-fat cream cheese regardless of brand. Some calculators round this up to 2g per ounce, which can account for a big difference when extrapolating to the 32 oz needed for this low carb cheesecake recipe.


Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.

Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
Who doesn’t love the creamy combination of chocolate and peanut butter? In the Jones house we go nutzo for anything chocolate and anything peanut butter. Now you can enjoy this delicious combination and stay in ketosis. That’s a huge win! Again, cottage cheese is the star of the show here and protein powder and splenda add a chocolaty flavor and sweeten. Pro tip: Choose a keto protein powder for enhanced benefits.
Hi Sarah, Sorry, I don’t have that detail of granularity. The chart is designed to show equivalents if someone has a different type of sweetener, but is not meant to be a way to combine sweeteners. I suppose you could try doing a conversion for half the sweetener amount needed in the recipe, then use half of the original and half of the conversion. I just can’t say for sure if the results would be the same, and it would depend on the recipe. For cheesecake filling it would probably be fine as long as you use either a powdered sweetener (as in powdered erythritol or monk fruit) or super concentrated liquid or powder (as in pure stevia powder/liquid).

“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
The ideal keto fruit is a high-fat, low-carb fruit. The two obvious choices here are coconut and avocado. Looking at ketogenic diet plans, you'll always see fat — that's the whole point of the diet, after all. However, it's important to diversify your fats. Don't always opt for milk products; instead, try swapping your whole milk for coconut milk or trading your butter for avocado butter.
An alternative way to get your sweet fix in a keto-friendly diet is through fruit shakes or milkshakes. You can make your own shakes and use alternative, keto-friendly sweeteners or purchase premade shake mixes. The Atkins diet shakes, for instance, are low-carbohydrate, protein-rich shakes available in a variety of sweet flavors (anything from French vanilla to strawberry).
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The meat replacement protein called Quorn is a sort of mushroom. It needs flavor adding and any factory-added crispy coating removing. It is a good vegetarian source of texture and protein. Low carb vegetables are crucial for your wellbeing on keto and boost your wellbeing. However, many people have had bad experiences with these powerful plants! Soggy sprouts in school canteens and being forced to vegetables have given them a bad reputation. You may need to experiment to find the textures, flavors and cooking methods YOU prefer. Make tasty sauces to serve with your low carb vegetables making them easier to eat. Low carb vegetables are crucial for nutritional wellbeing. You will benefit immensely from adding them to your keto diet.

Again, generally speaking, in proportion to their fat content, nuts are pretty low in carbs. Looking at the examples below, an ounce of the almonds would have about 2.9 grams of net carbs and the same amount of macadamia nuts would have 1.5 grams. It’s important to account for net carbs over total carbs, since nuts contain fiber, which is indigestible. Therefore, net carbs refer to the number that is usable by the body. Check out the Perfect Keto Guide to Net Carbs for more.
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
Roasted nuts and seeds are a great addition to your ketogenic diet and will help you get to your weight loss goals without having to starve yourself. All you have to do is be careful not to eat too much and measure your doses as this particular type of diet is easy to overeat. Once you have that under control, you are well on your way to the body of your dreams. Happy dieting!

In prospective cohort studies, increased nut intake has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease,[8] type 2 diabetes mellitus,[9][10] metabolic syndrome,[11] colon cancer,[12] hypertension,[13] gallstone disease,[14] diverticulitis,[15] and death from inflammatory diseases.[16] Overall, nuts and seeds are great foods to promote overall health and well-being in both the short and long-term!


Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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