Prior to your response, I did make a cheesecake, using your recipe for the filling (so delish, and I received all favorable comments on it). Due to the cost difference between almond and coconut flour, I did find a recipe similar to the one you shared in your response, 1/2 C melted butter (1 stick) whisked until fully blended with 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp vanilla. Then slowly mix in 3/4 C sifted coconut flour. Kneaded for about a minute, adding coconut flour until not sticky. I simply then pressed crust into only the bottom portion of the springform pan, used a fork to punch multiple holes in it, then baked at 400° for 10 minutes. I let it fully cool before adding filling, then used your perfect instructions to bake the cheesecake. Love, love, love this recipe. I’m a happy Type-II Diabetic!
I totally understand how you feel! 😊 But the truth is that most people can't do that... speaking from my own experience. When I started following a low-carb diet my palate was completely different to what it is now and I couldn't imagine skipping sweeteners, bread alternatives and other substitutes. They helped me transition into the way I eat now. These days I don't use any sweeteners - or just a small amount in occasional treats. I keep my diet very simple and often cook with just 5-10 ingredients.
Transfer the silicone mat to a large baking sheet. Bake 20 to 30 minutes, until golden brown and the edges are beginning to crisp up, then turn off the oven and let the crackers remain inside. If the edge pieces are browning too fast, simply remove them and let the remaining crackers sit in the warm oven until firm to the touch. They will continue to crisp up as they cool.
These pancakes do not turn out firm enough for you to be able to flip them in the air, but that is exactly what makes them so incredibly soft, fragile, meltable inside your mouth, etc. At this point, for some reason, I can’t help but hear Debra Morgan from the Dexter series using the f-word like a hundred times to compliment on the softness of the pancakes.
This Cheesy Gluten Free & Keto Chicken Quesadilla Recipe can be Made in Under 20 Minutes!!! It’s Incredibly Easy to Make and Tastes Just Like a Traditional Mexican Style Quesadilla. The Low Carb and Keto Cheese Shell is a Perfect Fit for this Classic. You’ll Wonder Why you Haven’t Tried This Sooner! It Makes an Awesome On The Go Lunch or an Easy to Throw Together Dinner. It Would also Be Great for Parties Because it Can be Made Ahead an Reheated in Just a Few Minutes.
Haven’t heard of The ketogenic diet (often called keto)?  It’s a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares similarities to paleo, Whole30, and Atkins. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. When your body switches to burning fat for its primary fuel source, that’s when you hit ketosis. While on the Keto diet you’re supposed to get at least 70 percent of your calories from fat, 15 to 25 percent from protein, and 10 percent from carbohydrates. You’re supposed to avoid all grains, legumes, root vegetables, fruit, (except berries) and sugar.
If you can’t have cheese on clean keto, at least you can have bacon? Well, sort of. Traditional bacon contains those pesky sulfites from before, along with nitrates (aka another carcinogen), Hunnes says. One recent study found a link between nitrate consumption and mania by looking at both humans and rats.[12] And nitrates are a common migraine trigger — one study found that they can actually alter our oral bacteria, which is what can set off the migraines. [13]
Maybe you remember that some years back, cottage cheese was a staple in everyone’s low-fat diet. If you could get past the texture, you probably purchased a 6 pack and forced yourself to swallow it down mid-day because you thought it was the secret to making those love handles disappear. I’m not saying you were wrong—but you weren’t completely right.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Even though star fruit is another fruit that some people don’t think to add to their grocery list, it’s worth a try if you’re on keto and want to satisfy your sweet tooth. A ½-cup serving of cubed star fruit contains about 2.6 g of net carbohydrates, plus 1.8 g of fiber and 2.6 g of sugar. It’s also low in calories and has 88 mg of potassium (1.9 percent DV) and 22.7 mg of vitamin C (38 percent DV). 

Eggs are also acceptable for you to eat on keto. The best part is that you don’t have to forgo the yolks, like many diets might require you to do. You can enjoy both the egg whites and the egg yolks when preparing your morning omelet. With only one gram of net carbs for each egg, you won’t have to feel guilty about having them as part of your diet.

You can usually use a mix of multiple flours to get a realistic texture in baking recipes. Combining flours and experimenting with your baking can lead to much lower net carb counts in recipes. We think these lemon poppyseed muffins (a mix of almond flour and flaxseed meal) make a great texture when combined with the fats from the heavy cream and butter.


Registered Dietitian Cynthia Sass, RD has helped clients give up dairy for a variety of reasons. “Some tested positive for a dairy allergy, or had struggled with symptoms of lactose intolerance. Others experienced signs of a dairy sensitivity, like bloating, fatigue, and frequent sinus infections. Still others wanted to test whether eliminating dairy would improve inflammatory skin conditions such as acne, or eczema. Each is a valid reason for giving milk and butter the old heave-ho.”
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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