Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.
If you can’t have cheese on clean keto, at least you can have bacon? Well, sort of. Traditional bacon contains those pesky sulfites from before, along with nitrates (aka another carcinogen), Hunnes says. One recent study found a link between nitrate consumption and mania by looking at both humans and rats.[12] And nitrates are a common migraine trigger — one study found that they can actually alter our oral bacteria, which is what can set off the migraines. [13]

There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.


When your body is low in potassium, it comes with an array of possible side effects, including: high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. Getting plenty of potassium in your diet can possibly prevent you from developing one of these health issues. Potassium may also help improve your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. 

Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
Chia seeds are 40% carbohydrates, mostly is in the form of dietary fiber. Fiber is an indigestible carb that does not impact blood sugar or ketone production. It's important for normal bowel movements and gut health in general. Chia is also 30% fat, most of which is omega-3 fatty acids (65%). This makes chia seeds a great source of this essential fatty acid.
Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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