If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.
The ketogenic diet has recently become very popular, and many food companies want to cash in by putting a “ketogenic” or “low carb” label on a new product. Be very cautious of special “keto” or “low-carb” products, such as pastas, chocolate bars, energy bars, protein powders, snack foods, cakes, cookies and other “low carb” or “ketogenic” treats. Read all labels carefully for natural low carb ingredients. The fewer ingredients the better.
Although there are plenty of low-carb fruits out there, not all types of fruit can fit into a ketogenic diet. In particular, dried fruits and fruit juices pack a concentrated amount of sugar and carbs into each serving and should be avoided altogether when cutting carbs to reach ketosis. Fruits canned in syrup may also be higher in sugar, which can quickly drive up calorie and carb consumption and hinder your progress.
Juices or juice concentrate. When the fruit is juiced, most of the fiber gets stripped from the final product. This makes the net carb content of fruit juice higher than it’s pure fruit counterpart and will have a more significant impact on your blood sugar. The exception to this would be lemon/lime juice in moderation, as it’s quite low in sugar compared to other juices.
However, you have to be careful how much of these keto nuts you eat. Too much can lead to selenium toxicity which causes nausea, vomiting, and brittle hair and nails. Besides selenium, Brazil nuts can help you reach your macros because they're almost 70% fat. They contain the perfect balance of both PUFA and MUFA fats. Studies on these keto nuts show that they're especially notable as antioxidant foods, protecting against cancer [11].
Native to Central America, chia was a stable to the Aztec in pre-Columbus times. The seeds gained popularity in the 1980s as a superfood. Keto dieters love them for their high fat content and health benefits. These seeds are tiny and oval. They are mostly gray in color with stripes, resembling miniature castor seeds. Chia have hydrophilic characteristics, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid.
Beware of added sugars or high-glycemic sweeteners in spice blends or condiments, but other than that, it’s fair game for keto. In spice-heavy dishes, carbs can add up, but don’t drive yourself crazy worrying about your teaspoon of turmeric. Check labels for additives like sugars, milk solids, potato starch, corn starch, or MSG, or make your own blends at home. Table salt often contains undisclosed fillers and anti-caking agents, so it’s best to opt for sea salt or Himalayan pink salt instead.
Oleuropein has been shown to produce numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial benefits. Olive consumption increases glutathione production in the cardiovascular system and helps to prevent cancer cell growth throughout the body. (34, 33)  Olives and olive oil are great foods to eat on a ketogenic diet.  I like the pitted Kalamata olives here
This recipe gives you one of the creamiest smoothies ever because it uses low-carb coconut yogurt and avocado. The flavor of the chocolate comes through really well, so this Keto drink would go down really well with the younger members of the family and can be a great way to get them off to a good start in the morning. The avocado adds healthy fats to the smoothie, so you will find it is filling too!

Overall, nuts can be an amazing addition to a healthy diet and can be a convenient snack, helping you stay full for longer periods of time and providing you with essential micronutrients. Because of their caloric density, they should be consumed in moderation and properly measured, and if you notice that they’re stalling you, you might want to limit them for a while.
Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).
Hi Jordan – thank you for reaching out. We have a ton of articles on here (https://theketoqueens.com/category/blog/) that you may find helpful. We also wrote a post about starting a keto diet (https://theketoqueens.com/keto-diet/), then we have a keto course that walks you step by step to starting a keto diet (under shop), and if you need individual keto coaching I do that on my other website LaraClevenger.com. Please let us know if you can help in any way.
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.
Artichoke, asparagus, bok choy and celery are all excellent for adding crunch and texture to salads or sides. Arugula, lettuce, cucumber, watercress and other salad leaves add fresh green nutrition to your meal. Eggplant is an excellent source of a potent anti-oxidants found just under its purple skin. Roast eggplant with oil, spices and sesame seed paste is a traditional Arabian dish called baba ganoush which has a deep creamy flavor and is perfect for keto! Snow peas, peppers and okra can also be enjoyed, but in moderation. Green and above ground plants are typically very low carb vegetables high in fiber and densely nutritious!

Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).


Along with nuts being extremely easy to consume in excess, they also have a high omega-6 content. Read my article about comparing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios to find out why we want a balanced ratio. In summary, the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is 1:4, but the average ratio is 1:20! An easy way to balance the ratio is to eliminate major sources of Omega-6 fatty acids from your diet. This could mean lowering nut consumption. Balancing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is important for preventing inflammation, promoting proper nervous system function, and improving overall health. The omega-3 and omega-6 contents of nuts is represented in the following graph.
Never before has so much attention been given to the healing and beneficial effects of plants. Study after study is confirming that plants have medicinal power. Some, like turmeric, rival modern pharmaceuticals in their ability to fight infection and even treat cancer. With the added bonus of working holistically with your body without side-effects. Plants reduce inflammation, support detoxification and generally improve your health!
If you're still not sure what to do, or you're a keto veteran and you're looking for some help, you should check out our coaching program. Ketovangelist coaches live keto all day, every day. We keep up to date on the latest science, too. But more importantly, we focus on your goals to help you achieve success in your keto journey. It's always better to have someone in your corner, guiding you along. So if you're ready for success, sign up for a coach today.
In order to save you time and money (from printing and shipping costs), instead of being mailed, The 3 Week Ketogenic Diet is provided to you as an instant download E-Book or e-books which you can read on your PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, Android, Smartphone, Tablet or E-Reader. You can transfer it to as many devices as you like, and even print out pages.

I stay away from any Greek yogurt with less than 10 % m.f. Lots of brands out there with +10% m.f., like Greek god, astro, Olympic, etc. If you can't find it in the grocery store, here's a tip I learned from a friend: get the highest percentage m.f. Greek yogurt you can find, then put it in a salad spinner and draw as much water out. The yogurt water is full of lactose (milk sugar). You will be left with a thicker yogurt that contains more fat (and protein) per portion, and less carbohydrates. You can then add heavy cream (+35% m.f. ) to thin out the strained yogurt to desired consistency or fat content.


I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
The gist of the eating plan? Taking in so few carbs sends your body into ketosis—a state of burning fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates or sugars, explains Beth Warren, RDN, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Secrets of a Kosher Girl: A 21-Day Nourishing Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great (Even If You're Not Jewish). In order to stay in ketosis, you only consume 5% to 10% of your calories from carbohydrates—which for most followers is fewer than 20 grams total per day—and instead eat moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of fat.
Legumes (beans, chickpeas, lentil, peanuts, etc). Apart from peanuts, legumes are relatively high in carbs and should be avoided. Apart from their high carb content, legumes contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. They have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. When it comes to peanuts, some people avoid them while others use them in moderation. If you are considering peanuts, make sure you read this post first: Peanuts on a Ketogenic Diet: Eat or Avoid?

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Hi Viola, Sorry you had issues with the cheesecake. Did you use the exact same ingredients? Did you check the video? I’d be happy to help troubleshoot if you can point to where it went differently for you. As for cracking, this is likely due to either drastic temperature changes or over-baking. Check the tips in the post above. Finally, instructions for the raspberry sauce are in the recipe notes on the recipe card.
I made this on Monday, let it sit in the fridge overnight and it was fabulous last night (Tuesday) and still fabulous tonight (Wednesday). My only minor issue was that the cream cheese didn’t seem to get smooth after blending and so after the cake sat and we ate it, you could taste the crumbles of cream cheese. When I started to bend the mixture (using hand mixer) I started off slow, then sped up the speed thinking that would help remove the clumps. But then I saw your note about not over-mixing because that would cause air pockets. I continued to blend but at a lower speed then just put it in the pan to bake..thinking maybe the clumps would sort themselves out while baking. What do you recommend for next time? Either way, it was fabulous! Thank you!!!
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Hi Jordan – thank you for reaching out. We have a ton of articles on here (https://theketoqueens.com/category/blog/) that you may find helpful. We also wrote a post about starting a keto diet (https://theketoqueens.com/keto-diet/), then we have a keto course that walks you step by step to starting a keto diet (under shop), and if you need individual keto coaching I do that on my other website LaraClevenger.com. Please let us know if you can help in any way.

Eggs are also acceptable for you to eat on keto. The best part is that you don’t have to forgo the yolks, like many diets might require you to do. You can enjoy both the egg whites and the egg yolks when preparing your morning omelet. With only one gram of net carbs for each egg, you won’t have to feel guilty about having them as part of your diet.


Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.

This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!

Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
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