Hi Reba, thank you for sharing your recipe with us! Not necessarily, peanuts are a matter of personal preference. If you can tolerate it, you can use it (I personally avoid it). I would still advice to soak and dehydrate the peanuts and then make peanut butter in a food processor rather than buying it ready-made. Franziska has been working on a post regarding health effects  of peanut butter so I will share some more tips soon 😊
The next plant superheroes belong to the allium family. This includes: Garlic, leek, scallion, onions and shallots. These low carb vegetables add a lot of flavor and a lot of health too! They are chemo-protective, preventing cancer via multiple mechanisms. Some onions are naturally sweet, this is why they brown and caramelize when cooked, so enjoy onions in moderation on keto.

Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.
I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.
I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.
Some people on keto think they can skip eating their greens and just focus on the keto macros. But, they miss out on the healing potential of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit add to the keto diet. It’s not just exotic species and tropical spices that are getting recognition, common low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruits are densely packed with super-nutrition. This new class of healing plants are becoming known as ‘functional foods’. They have an important role to play in a healthy keto diet.
Yogurt is full of carbs so it would be better to eat a carbmaster like Kroger sells if you want to eat yogurt. Yes it is low fat but I like to add whipping cream for the extra good fat. Also, KETO is not a DIET! It is a way of eating. You will eat this way from now on. There is no eating KETO, then going back to regular way of eating. Your regular way got you in the mess in the first place. Once you go real KETO, it’s with you forever.
How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.

If you didn’t already hear all the buzz surrounding going keto, now’s the time to get familiarized with the trend. The ketogenic diet, or keto for short, is centered around eating high fat, moderate protein, and super-low-carb foods so that your body begins burning through your fat stores rather than glucose for energy. Essentially, you eat loads of fat from foods such as cheese, bacon, and coconut oil—and get lean! (Psst: it’s also how Kourtney Kardashian and Halle Berry keep trim and toned.)
With the help of keto-friendly ingredients, you can easily make yourself some delicious, fluffy pancakes. There are, in fact, several ways to make fantastic keto pancakes, but our favorite is the Faux “Buckwheat” Pancakes made with almond flour and flaxseed meal. Try them for yourself if you want low-carb pancakes that taste just like the real thing.
Native to Central America, chia was a stable to the Aztec in pre-Columbus times. The seeds gained popularity in the 1980s as a superfood. Keto dieters love them for their high fat content and health benefits. These seeds are tiny and oval. They are mostly gray in color with stripes, resembling miniature castor seeds. Chia have hydrophilic characteristics, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid.
Try to replace all soda and juice consumption with something that has no sugar or only trace amounts of sugar. Switch out fruit juices for low-carb smoothies and tea. Tea comes in a variety of flavors that can help you get through the day if you get tired of water. There are a variety of different smoothies you can make for a meal replacement or as a quick snack as well.
The nominal amount of carbs allowed on keto makes it challenging to find snacks that won't screw up your diet. But nuts should be a go-to for any keto enthusiast, as they're high in fat without being loaded with too many carbs. If you're looking for the lowest carb nuts, add these to your emergency snack stash so you're prepared when hunger strikes.

This milk yogurt contains just 1 gram of net carbs, giving you a little wiggle room when it comes to carbohydrates. If you are craving additional sweetness, you can choose to sweeten your low carb yogurt with a keto-friendly sweetener, like stevia or monk fruit. You could also top with fresh fruit like blueberries or raspberries, avoiding high-carb fruits. Or, make a yogurt parfait with chia seeds and keto yogurt topped with homemade whipped cream, made with heavy whipping cream or coconut cream.

This is my own personal alternative, though I've recently fallen back in love with Greek yogurt again (normally the texture and waxy coating it leaves in my mouth are very off-putting...). Looking at this now, I could easily see adding an unflavored/flavored protein powder and/or collagen to make this have more of a protein content. You might even mix pureed cottage cheese with the sour cream. I'm not sure what that would do for texture... Possibilities are endless, really, once you master the initial recipe.
The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.
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When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.

Hi Jewell, Thank you for clarifying. Sorry to hear it was bitter! I’ve never experienced that before, either. Just the opposite, people often comment that this tastes just like a “regular” (not low carb or gluten-free) cheesecake. 🙂 I’m not sure where the bitterness would come from. What sweetener did you use, and did that taste bitter to you at all? Powdered erythritol doesn’t usually have any bitterness, but stevia does tend to have a bitter aftertaste (which is stronger in some brands).


I am slightly (?) confused—in the article you use phrases such as “the low carb yogurt theory”–it can be assumed–expect approximately–The actual number of carbs has been proven– Theory, assumed, expect, and “has been proven” just seem to be at odds with each other…I’ve given up Yogurt while on a keto diet and miss it. How are these claims substantiated? Appreciate any assistance you can provide..Brian Jamieson
Pecans are my favorite in the fall-time. I love dry roasted pecans. They are easy to roast yourself, and they make your house smell amazing. To roast, first soak the nuts in water overnight. Then, drain and place on a baking sheet in the oven at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 12-24 hours. Toss halfway and roast until the nuts are crunchy, and not soggy.

Milk (only small amounts of raw, full-fat milk is allowed). Milk is not recommended for several reasons. Firstly, all the dairy products, milk is difficult to digest, as it lacks the "good" bacteria (eliminated through pasteurization) and may even contain hormones. Secondly, it is quite high in carbs (4-5 grams of carbs per 100 ml). For coffee and tea, replace milk with cream in reasonable amounts. You may have a small amount of raw milk but be aware of the extra carbs. Lastly, farmers in the United States use genetically engineered bovine growth hormone (rBGH). rBGH is injected to dairy cows to increase milk production. Opt for full-fat dairy labeled “NO rBGH”.


Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
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