Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.


Chia seeds are 40% carbohydrates, mostly is in the form of dietary fiber. Fiber is an indigestible carb that does not impact blood sugar or ketone production. It's important for normal bowel movements and gut health in general. Chia is also 30% fat, most of which is omega-3 fatty acids (65%). This makes chia seeds a great source of this essential fatty acid.
Well, if you’ve been on the keto train for a while or just recently got your ticket punched then you know that this is a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In 2013, the European Journal of Nutrition study results showed the risk of obesity was not associated with high-fat dairy consumption (2). And a study done in 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality was not caused by increased circulation of dairy fatty acids in the body (2). Now we know that cottage cheese is not the cause of your body looking like cottage cheese or your heart turning into it.
The typical carb count in nuts and seeds is about 12.6 grams for every 28 grams at the highest and 3.5 grams for every 28 grams at the lowest. You’re probably thinking: that’s pretty high, but most of this carbohydrate content comes in the form of fiber, which body cannot digest. It passes through your intestines without being digested and goes into bulking up your stool for easier passage when you answer Mother Nature’s Call.
Keep in mind that, although there are plenty of keto-friendly fruit options out there, consumption of fruit on the keto diet should still be limited. Even on a modified keto diet, it’s recommended to aim for around 30–50 grams of net carbs per day to maintain ketosis and maximize results. Even one or two servings of these low-carb fruits can knock out a good chunk of your daily carb allotment in one shot, effectively kicking you out ketosis.
This strict restriction in carbohydrates means that a lot of foods need to be eliminated. Foods that are normally considered healthy, like fruits, have a high carb content — and the general rule is that the higher the number of carbohydrates the less of that food you can have on a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this means that many otherwise healthy, high-carb fruits, like apples and bananas, must be eliminated, eaten rarely or eaten only in very small amounts.
When trying to shift from a high carb diet to a ketogenic diet, cravings can definitely get strong. It’s always best to try to clean house before you start so that you don’t have food around you that can lead to cravings. We recommend that when switching to keto, you restrict using sweeteners completely for the first 30 days. It normally leads to breaking sugar addiction and ultimately not having cravings.
A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok. 

We love cheese’s creamy and smooth texture, but when you need a little crunch, it’s Whisps to the rescue! The crispy snack is made with 100 percent real cheese and is baked until it boasts a cracker-like texture and crunch. When you’re avoiding saltines, grab these low-carb thins and use them as a base for other fat-filled toppings such as jerky bits or avocado.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
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