In 2018, sales of whole milk and whole-fat yogurt have increased by 1.6 percent and 11.6 percent, respectively, as fat-free yogurt has decreased by 10.9 percent. This shift in taste has birthed a slew of high-fat yogurts. Siggi’s 9 percent Triple Cream first came to market in 2017; it is now available nationwide in markets like Whole Foods, which is where I bought mine.


Yes, specifically these are geared to help me get in my daily fuel from fats without having to resort to something with more carbs or more protein than my body needs. My fiance said that these taste a lot like fancy yogurt to him but thicker, which he loves. It is like a really dense custardy mousse, which works for both of us. And he normally can't tolerate the sour cream in any form, but I guess pouring into the still warm dissolved gelatin nullifies whatever processing agent he's sensitive too. The fat count here is what makes this such an amazingly satisfying treat, and yogurt usually isn't kind to my stomach, but I imagine you could use the yogurt, as long as you are using full fat yogurt... Too much protein turns to sugar in the bloodstream, and that's something I am trying to avoid. I like the gelatin added for joint support.
There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
Your body needs micro-nutrition and phyto-nutrition. Micro-nutrition is the vitamins and minerals found in both plants and animals, but phyto-nutrition is the special compounds found only in plants. Phyto means light, so it is the nutrition plants make from light using photosynthesis. Some of these compounds create the color or flavor of the plant. Some plants naturally have more of these special compounds than others, for example the bright yellow root, and cooking spice, turmeric contains curcumin. This phyto-nutrient has a potent anti-inflammatory effect. Some countries have already approved its use in the treatment of cancer.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”

We love cheese’s creamy and smooth texture, but when you need a little crunch, it’s Whisps to the rescue! The crispy snack is made with 100 percent real cheese and is baked until it boasts a cracker-like texture and crunch. When you’re avoiding saltines, grab these low-carb thins and use them as a base for other fat-filled toppings such as jerky bits or avocado.
Nuts are versatile and have tons of uses in a ketogenic diet besides snack. There is a nut butter, oil, or flour version of almost any nut. They are a great tool to help you stay on track if you choose to include them in your diet. I like to enjoy nuts and nut butter on occasion, especially the ones that are highest in fat, like pili nuts. I rarely use nut oils (with the exception of coconut oil, which isn’t really a nut anyway) because they can be very expensive, but nut flours are great to use in baking.
This is such a pretty dish even though it is so simple to prepare! Layers of fruit and rich and velvety yogurt give you a striped effect that could be turned into an impressive dessert at a dinner party if you serve the parfait in champagne flutes. However putting it into small jars makes it a portable Paleo snack for a lunchbox, or to take with you on a family picnic.
Low in fat and high in protein, cottage cheese has long been a staple for many dieters. However, people on the keto diet may want to be careful about eating cottage cheese in abundance. A single cup of small curd cottage cheese has roughly 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although it may be good to eat alone as a filling snack, be careful about pairing it with other foods that have traces of carbs, like avocados and nuts.
Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.
Coconut offers nutritional and medicinal properties from its fatty acid content. This means that every time you use ingredients such as coconut oil or coconut milk, you're obtaining a ton of beneficial nutrients while still adhering to your ketogenic diet. Coconut products are some of the easiest ingredients to integrate into smoothies, stews and soups. Just make sure there aren't any added sugars in any of the coconut products you use.
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.

This is my own personal alternative, though I've recently fallen back in love with Greek yogurt again (normally the texture and waxy coating it leaves in my mouth are very off-putting...). Looking at this now, I could easily see adding an unflavored/flavored protein powder and/or collagen to make this have more of a protein content. You might even mix pureed cottage cheese with the sour cream. I'm not sure what that would do for texture... Possibilities are endless, really, once you master the initial recipe.


Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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