On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).
Native to Central America, chia was a stable to the Aztec in pre-Columbus times. The seeds gained popularity in the 1980s as a superfood. Keto dieters love them for their high fat content and health benefits. These seeds are tiny and oval. They are mostly gray in color with stripes, resembling miniature castor seeds. Chia have hydrophilic characteristics, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid.

In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.


DO avoid fast food. I understand sometimes it might be the only option, but if you aren’t desperate don’t eat it.  I have found it doesn’t even taste good anymore. Even though you can get bunless burgers at McDonald’s or wherever, fast food just isn’t healthy. It is full of chemicals and preservatives and they usually don’t even use real cheese and the meat often has fillers. Even the salads could have hidden sugars.
The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.
I'm asking because I'm on keto diet and finding how to get as much fiber as possible.If I need at least 25g of fiber/day(WHO), and for example not to exceed 50g of net carbs/day on Keto the math is easy. I can technically eat only food with max. ratio 1g fibre to 2g net carb - it means approx. half of nuts & seeds you listed. But If I multiply the fibre content by 0.3 to have just soluble fibre, I can't eat almost no nuts & seeds 😊
Hi Norma, The filling calls for confectioner’s (powdered) sweetener, and the crust can be either one, but I use regular (granulated) for the crust. If the filling is crunchy, what you have is granulated. Like you said, it still tastes good but the texture isn’t smooth if you don’t use confectioner’s. You can turn granulated into powdered by running it through a food processor for a while. Otherwise, you can buy the confectioner’s erythritol that I used here.
Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
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