“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
Even though star fruit is another fruit that some people don’t think to add to their grocery list, it’s worth a try if you’re on keto and want to satisfy your sweet tooth. A ½-cup serving of cubed star fruit contains about 2.6 g of net carbohydrates, plus 1.8 g of fiber and 2.6 g of sugar. It’s also low in calories and has 88 mg of potassium (1.9 percent DV) and 22.7 mg of vitamin C (38 percent DV). 

I scanned all my ingredients and also clicked on your links. My almond flour matches with the same amount of carbs but when I input everything, it has my net carbs as 4. My app may round up for some (I use Carb Manager). I think for me, the full carbs from the cream cheese is 32 oz of cream cheese at 32 net carbs (my box of cream cheese shows >1 for 1 oz) Bobs Red Mill almond flour at 2 cups for 24 net carbs and my 3 eggs show 1 carb. All together it puts it at 3.56 carbs per slice based on just those carbs. So not too far off from the 3 carbs.
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs. 

Thank you! My husband is diabetic and really LOVES dessert! Great tasting low carb desserts have been a challenge. This cheesecake is AWESOME! Creamy and luscious. And no guilt about eating dessert every evening. I had to bake it about 25 minutes more than specified. But that could have been attributed to my oven temps, the weather, beating too much, etc. Absolutely no complaints. As soon as we ate the last piece, he asked me to make another. Definitely on our repeat list of desserts.

Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
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