Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
Hi Maya! Will be trying this recipe for my husband’s birthday this weekend. I’m new to keto and my husband is supporting me with cutting out sugar as much as he can. I just have 1 question – in the nutrition facts, you mentioned net carbs 5g, fiber 1g and sugar 2g. What is the difference between net carbs and sugar? I thought the sugar count is a part of total carbs subtracting the fiber which would mean the sugar count is equal to the net carbs? Hope you can explain further! Thank you 🙂

Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!

Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake.

If you can’t find Carb Master milk at your local grocery store, you can easily substitute another dairy option. When selecting an alternative source for your keto yogurt, remember that keto dairy should be organic, grass fed and high-fat. Avoid 1% and 2% dairy products, which are typically loaded with carbohydrates. Instead, select raw milk, heavy cream or heavy whipping cream.
In contrast, the Atkins diet is a low-carbohydrate diet that allows you to eat more protein and carbs than the ketogenic diet, while paleo diets focus on selecting foods that were consumed before farming became popular and don't necessarily restrict your carb intake. In general, people adhering to ketogenic diets consume only between 20 and 50 grams of carbohydrates per day.
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
This milk yogurt contains just 1 gram of net carbs, giving you a little wiggle room when it comes to carbohydrates. If you are craving additional sweetness, you can choose to sweeten your low carb yogurt with a keto-friendly sweetener, like stevia or monk fruit. You could also top with fresh fruit like blueberries or raspberries, avoiding high-carb fruits. Or, make a yogurt parfait with chia seeds and keto yogurt topped with homemade whipped cream, made with heavy whipping cream or coconut cream.
These were super yummy!!! I used Mexican Style Shredded Cheese by Kroger which has less than 1 gram of carbs and 100 calories per ounce. My daughter and I each had 1 taco. She loved it! We both loved how much more flavor there was than regular tacos shells. I’m thinking about using this as a crust for pizza, too! Cheese crust! Yum! Thank you for this recipe!!!
Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.

These taste so freaking good. I used this filling and the crust/baking directions from the pina colada cheesecake cupcake recipe. The only thing I would change is to make sure to include directions to beat the eggs into the cream cheese/sweetener mixture on the lowest speed to avoid getting air bubbles in there!!! I beat them too fast and ended up with cheesecakes that puffed way up in the oven and the deflated when they cooled and it made the texture a little off. Planning on making them again sometime because they seriously taste amazing and were pretty easy, just sucks because I was making these for graduation and made 2.5 dozen and none turned out right 🙁 

I’ve made this cheesecake twice now, and it is sooooooo easy and delicious! I’ve gotten great results by just following the recipe as you wrote it. I radically changed mine and my husband’s diet after we got the news that his blood sugar was a bit too high (pre-diabetic). His blood sugar is normal when he eats according to keto principles, and it’s nice for me to be able to give him a treat once in a while that won’t spike his blood sugar. Thanks so much for this recipe!
If you have a cow’s milk intolerance, you might find goat’s milk can be a good replacement as it is much easier to digest and won’t upset your system. This is a great recipe if you fancy trying goat’s milk yogurt and it can be used in all the ways you would use other yogurts. You will find that this one is rather thin, so if you like your yogurt thicker, strain the mixture through a cloth and the result will be much better.

Any of these sweeteners can help you stick with your ketogenic diet, keep your carbohydrates and sugars low and still obtain your sweet fix. Many are indigestible, which means they don't become carbohydrates at all, and your body just excretes them as waste. Just make sure that if you opt to use fruit powders like lucuma and monk fruit powder, no extra sugars have been added.
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
Lower-carb veggies, like cucumber, celery, asparagus, squash, and zucchini; cruciferous veggies, like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts; nightshades, like eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers; root vegetables, like onion, garlic, and radishes, and sea veggies, like nori and kombu. The guidelines are simple: focus on dark, leafy greens, then the stuff that grows above the ground, then root vegetables.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).

There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
Because the body turns the fat into energy after its carbohydrate stores are depleted, the ketogenic diet has potential weight loss benefits. Research has shown that fats and proteins are the most satiating, while carbohydrates are the least. Because you feel full longer after eating fats and proteins, you reduce the number of calories you eat overall.

Still iffy about certain fruits? Double check the carbohydrate counts in a nutrition database to make sure your fruit of choice is not too sugary. The carb counts can really creep up on you if you don’t track and measure. Be careful! Don’t let your sweet tooth take over your portion control or you will kick your cute little butt right out of ketosis.

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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