This recipe uses kefir grains as the active ingredient to make the yogurt, and you can taste the mixture periodically to see how sour you like the yogurt. Once you have strained the mixture to remove the kefir grains, this yogurt can be stored in the refrigerator so you have a good supply for breakfast or as a snack for the kids after school. You can mix in some fruit or add in vanilla extract for extra flavor.
This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
If you’re new or just still learning the ropes for the keto diet food list, your biggest questions probably revolve around figuring out just what high-fat low-carb foods you can eat on such a low-carb, ketogenic diet. Overall, remember that the bulk of calories on the keto diet are from foods that are high in natural fats along with a moderate amount of foods with protein. Those that are severely restricted are all foods that provide lots of carbs, even kinds that are normally thought of as “healthy,” like whole grains, for example.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.

Thank you for such a wonderful informative article. You give everyone all this knowledge for free & people still want more. Give me printable versions of food list & protein charts. Come on people do a little leg work yourself, show some initiative. If you can’t your not going to be disciplined enough to make this diet work. There are links above to get free meal plans & more keto info. I’ve lost 60 lbs in 10 months & changed my life. My single best piece of advise? Buy a good keto info & recipe book. Key word in last sentence is “GOOD”. Hard copy for instant reference. Worth its weight in gold.
The next plant superheroes belong to the allium family. This includes: Garlic, leek, scallion, onions and shallots. These low carb vegetables add a lot of flavor and a lot of health too! They are chemo-protective, preventing cancer via multiple mechanisms. Some onions are naturally sweet, this is why they brown and caramelize when cooked, so enjoy onions in moderation on keto.
Still iffy about certain fruits? Double check the carbohydrate counts in a nutrition database to make sure your fruit of choice is not too sugary. The carb counts can really creep up on you if you don’t track and measure. Be careful! Don’t let your sweet tooth take over your portion control or you will kick your cute little butt right out of ketosis.
What’s more breakfast-y than eggs? Don’t say cereal. These cottage cheese egg muffins are easy. It’s that fancy breakfast that you didn’t even have to try hard to make fancy. Make a quick bulk batch and take them on the go through the week. The best part is that you can mix it up and make minor adjustments to cater to every family members taste buds.

If it’s not obvious already, cottage cheese will be your new keto sidekick. Forget about your friend who said she was going to do it with you– cottage cheese will be there to help out. With tons of recipe varieties you’ll be hooked. Go shopping with our Ultimate Keto Shopping List and  try some of the recipes above and let me know in the comment which your favorites were!


Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.
Just when you thought your midnight-snacking of shredded cheese could be considered a healthy habit thanks to keto… (You kid, you knew it was too good to be true all along.) Cheese in general is not recommended on clean keto or the Bulletproof Diet. Dairy proteins are among the worst offenders for allergies and inflammation. If your body doesn’t like casein, your immune system will attack every time you eat it. The reaction may be subtle and chronic, or it could trigger an autoimmune flare-up and other inflammatory conditions. Cheese also harbors tons of toxic mold from the animal’s diet.[11]
Hi Fariba, Yes, you’d need more of the crust for sure, probably about 25% more (multiply the amount of each ingredient in the crust by 1.25). For the filling, you could probably keep it the same to avoid messing with conversions, and the cheesecake would just be a shorter height. Some recipes use sour cream for texture or moisture, but this recipe doesn’t need it.
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).
Hi Nanette, For this recipe I recommend a granulated sweetener in the crust and either powdered erythritol or powdered monk fruit in the filling. Pure stevia extract would be very concentrated and may change the end result. A stevia blend may work but the amount would vary depending on which one it is and what else is in it. You can check my sweetener conversion chart which can help if you look up the type you are using.
Yes, specifically these are geared to help me get in my daily fuel from fats without having to resort to something with more carbs or more protein than my body needs. My fiance said that these taste a lot like fancy yogurt to him but thicker, which he loves. It is like a really dense custardy mousse, which works for both of us. And he normally can't tolerate the sour cream in any form, but I guess pouring into the still warm dissolved gelatin nullifies whatever processing agent he's sensitive too. The fat count here is what makes this such an amazingly satisfying treat, and yogurt usually isn't kind to my stomach, but I imagine you could use the yogurt, as long as you are using full fat yogurt... Too much protein turns to sugar in the bloodstream, and that's something I am trying to avoid. I like the gelatin added for joint support.
How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.
For this reason, it’s best to fill your plate mostly with healthy fats, protein foods and non-starchy vegetables, all of which can provide a good amount of nutrients and a low amount of carbs to help optimize your diet. Avocados, along with other fats such as coconut oil, olive oil, ghee and grass-fed butter, can be used to boost your intake of heart-healthy fats to reach ketosis. However, other higher-carb varieties such as berries, watermelon or cantaloupe should be consumed in small amounts and used as a substitute for high-sugar sweets and snacks the next time cravings strike. Also, check out these other keto friendly snacks.

Well, if you’ve been on the keto train for a while or just recently got your ticket punched then you know that this is a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In 2013, the European Journal of Nutrition study results showed the risk of obesity was not associated with high-fat dairy consumption (2). And a study done in 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality was not caused by increased circulation of dairy fatty acids in the body (2). Now we know that cottage cheese is not the cause of your body looking like cottage cheese or your heart turning into it.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
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