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Copyright © 2019 Leaf Group Ltd. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the LIVESTRONG.COM Terms of Use , Privacy Policy and Copyright Policy . The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies.
Hi there, I haven’t tried this recipe with xylitol or stevia, but either one should work. For the xylitol, you can use almost the same amount as the erythritol, maybe just scant measuring cups. (Xylitol is just slightly sweeter than erythritol.) For the stevia, it will depend on the brand, because some are more concentrated than others. I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use, which include xylitol and several brands of stevia. If you use a granulated sweetener like xylitol in the filling, run it through a food processor or high-power blender for a few minutes first, to make it powdered. By the way, it’s very thoughtful of you to make this cheesecake for your husband’s birthday! 🙂

This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!


Along with nuts being extremely easy to consume in excess, they also have a high omega-6 content. Read my article about comparing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios to find out why we want a balanced ratio. In summary, the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is 1:4, but the average ratio is 1:20! An easy way to balance the ratio is to eliminate major sources of Omega-6 fatty acids from your diet. This could mean lowering nut consumption. Balancing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is important for preventing inflammation, promoting proper nervous system function, and improving overall health. The omega-3 and omega-6 contents of nuts is represented in the following graph.
The problem with some meats when you’re on Keto is that they are too lean. That means, even though it’s low in carbs, some meat has too much protein and not enough fat. That doesn’t mean you can’t have those meats. It just means you’ll need to be careful not to go over your protein macro. And if there isn’t enough fat in the meat you eat, then you will want to pick up some extra, healthy fat somewhere else.

Rami co-founded Tasteaholics with Vicky at the start of 2015 to master the art of creating extremely delicious food while researching the truth behind nutrition, dieting and overall health. You can usually find him marketing, coding or coming up with the next crazy idea because he can't sit still for too long. His top read is The 4-Hour Workweek and he loves listening to Infected Mushroom in his spare time.
For this reason, it’s best to fill your plate mostly with healthy fats, protein foods and non-starchy vegetables, all of which can provide a good amount of nutrients and a low amount of carbs to help optimize your diet. Avocados, along with other fats such as coconut oil, olive oil, ghee and grass-fed butter, can be used to boost your intake of heart-healthy fats to reach ketosis. However, other higher-carb varieties such as berries, watermelon or cantaloupe should be consumed in small amounts and used as a substitute for high-sugar sweets and snacks the next time cravings strike. Also, check out these other keto friendly snacks.
Over the span of 21 months she got rid of 105 pounds (260 to 155) and went from a size 20W to a size 4/6. Besides weight loss the benefits are numerous: She is med free and no more Type 2 Diabetes symptoms, no more sleep apnea, normal cholesterol, she sleeps better, breathes better, no longer has brain fog and she feels happier and healthier than she ever has.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.

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Again, generally speaking, in proportion to their fat content, nuts are pretty low in carbs. Looking at the examples below, an ounce of the almonds would have about 2.9 grams of net carbs and the same amount of macadamia nuts would have 1.5 grams. It’s important to account for net carbs over total carbs, since nuts contain fiber, which is indigestible. Therefore, net carbs refer to the number that is usable by the body. Check out the Perfect Keto Guide to Net Carbs for more.
These keto nuts are one of the best sources of vitamin E, niacin, folate, magnesium, and choline. All of these nutrients are lacking in our diets, especially choline, a vitamin-like essential nutrient. You need choline to keep your liver and brain healthy [8]. Choline is also the precursor to acetylcholine [9] – a neurotransmitter important for muscle functioning among other things.

Even though star fruit is another fruit that some people don’t think to add to their grocery list, it’s worth a try if you’re on keto and want to satisfy your sweet tooth. A ½-cup serving of cubed star fruit contains about 2.6 g of net carbohydrates, plus 1.8 g of fiber and 2.6 g of sugar. It’s also low in calories and has 88 mg of potassium (1.9 percent DV) and 22.7 mg of vitamin C (38 percent DV). 


When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
Hi Fariba, Yes, you’d need more of the crust for sure, probably about 25% more (multiply the amount of each ingredient in the crust by 1.25). For the filling, you could probably keep it the same to avoid messing with conversions, and the cheesecake would just be a shorter height. Some recipes use sour cream for texture or moisture, but this recipe doesn’t need it.
One thing to keep in mind: If it's whipped cream you're after (and not whipping cream, to add to your coffee), it might be best to, uh, whip it up yourself (one cup of the whipped stuff has under four grams of carbs and just over 43 grams of fat), since most store-bought versions have added sugar. To do that, all you need is heavy whipping cream, a hand mixer and a mixing bowl, and you whisk until the cream becomes fluffy. Add a pinch of pure vanilla extract for some flavor.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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