I can’t figure out why this recipe calls for 32oz. of cream cheese, even if making into 12 cupcakes; I ended up with a huge amount of the “cake” part after filling the cups. I could have followed the Pina Colada cupcakes but because I didn’t plan to add the Pina Colada ingredients, I thought it best to follow this regular cheesecake recipe. Did I miss something that told me to reduce the amount of ingredients if making cupcakes? Everything still tasted great but I have a ton of product left over.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
Likely the most informative “health email” that I have EVER received. So informative. Thank you for your generosity Dr. Jockers. You are an amazing doctor. I have been battling Ulcerative Colitis for 10 years and I always say that most doctors lack the most important “doctor quality” of all . . . compassion. However, Dr. Jockers, you are full of compassion. Thank you for the summit and this follow up email. I wish you peace, love and happiness.
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A 100 grams of raw avocado comes with only 1,8 grams of net carbs and as much as 14,7 grams of fat. Most of this fat is monounsaturated (MUFA), which reduce risk of cardiovascular diseases and other inflammation-related diseases [8]. Besides that, avocado is rich in vitamins C, E, K, B6, and folate. Avocado is also a good source of potassium, which is a mineral that most of us need to get more of.
Rami co-founded Tasteaholics with Vicky at the start of 2015 to master the art of creating extremely delicious food while researching the truth behind nutrition, dieting and overall health. You can usually find him marketing, coding or coming up with the next crazy idea because he can't sit still for too long. His top read is The 4-Hour Workweek and he loves listening to Infected Mushroom in his spare time.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.

Love all your information. Thank you for taking the time to share all your useful information. I do have a question about my recent start on my keto program. According to what I believe I am doing. I feel as though I am doing everything right. I keep track of my macros which come in under my allotted measurements. I drink my keto coffee, have meats eggs and fish that are allowed, have made certain snacks and keto bombs to keep in the freezer for those sweet attacks. However, I keep testing urin on the test strips and it is yet to show where I am in ketosis. I have literally not had one unhealthy carb in 2 weeks. The scale does show a 7 lb drop. But let’s be truthful that is water weight. I most of all I’m looking for indicators that I am in ketosis. I should also mention that I have not had any symptoms of ketosis flu either. I have read all your suggestions along with scouring the internet with hours and hours and hours of time spent reading. I do take my MCT oil a tablespoon a day in my Bulletproof Coffee. I do have to have my heavy cream and Splenda in my coffee in order for me to drink it. That is the only thing that I can think of. But I can’t see where that would completely not allow my body to get into ketosis. You are opinion would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.

The next plant superheroes belong to the allium family. This includes: Garlic, leek, scallion, onions and shallots. These low carb vegetables add a lot of flavor and a lot of health too! They are chemo-protective, preventing cancer via multiple mechanisms. Some onions are naturally sweet, this is why they brown and caramelize when cooked, so enjoy onions in moderation on keto. 

This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.

Low-carb yogurts make perfect dipping sauces for veggie chips or crudités for parties or for film night! The yogurt can be flavored or plain, depending on your taste but the one in this great Keto recipe is flavored with lemon and dill, complementing the crunchy, cheesy parmesan crust on the zucchini. You will find that because the sauce has dill in it, this would also go nicely with fish.
The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.
If, on the other hand, you lower the amount of carbs in your diet and increase the amount of fats, your body will go into a state known as ketosis. This is the source of the name 'ketogenic' in 'ketogenic diet’. In this state, your liver will break fats in your diet down and produce ketones, an energy source. Your body would pretty much rather use glucose as a primary source of energy but, when forced to look for an alternative, it will resort to burning fat instead.
Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance.  Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis.  One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods.  So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy.  Here are 22 ketogenic foods that you will LOVE!
It only takes a few seconds to whip up a tuna salad or a couple minutes to pan fry a steak. If you stick with the basics, meat and veggies, it’s no different than fixing any other type of meal at home. Don’t overcomplicate it with keto versions of your old favorites – those are the things that turn into projects instead of dinner. Maybe basic-bland can get you started… once you’re comfortable with the change you can take more on? Maybe your tastes will change after you aren’t eating all the processed food? You’ve got to make it work for you.
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
Thank you, Erica. Sorry, mascarpone won’t work in a baked cheesecake – it melts into a butter-like consistency when heated. Also, just so you know, mascarpone does not have 0 carbs. Manufacturers get away with writing 0 because they can round down if it’s less than 1 gram per serving. Mascarpone has 0.3 grams carbs per tablespoon, and cream cheese has 0.8 grams per tablespoon.
The ketogenic diet focuses on cutting carb consumption and increasing fat intake to reach ketosis, a metabolic state in which the body begins burning fat for energy when glucose stores are running low. This typically involves decreasing intake of high-carb foods like grains, starches, legumes and sugary snacks while increasing consumption of healthy fats such as coconut oil, olive oil, grass-fed butter and ghee.
If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.

Be aware of the effects of nightshades on your body; while they are permitted in ketosis, they cause inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis in sensitive people. Nightshades include tomatoes, tomatillos, peppers, okra, and eggplant. For a Bulletproof ketosis, also limit onions and garlic, which tend to be moldy and can disrupt your alpha brain waves. Plus, lightly cook any oxalate-heavy cruciferous and leafy greens.[1]
I'm asking because I'm on keto diet and finding how to get as much fiber as possible.If I need at least 25g of fiber/day(WHO), and for example not to exceed 50g of net carbs/day on Keto the math is easy. I can technically eat only food with max. ratio 1g fibre to 2g net carb - it means approx. half of nuts & seeds you listed. But If I multiply the fibre content by 0.3 to have just soluble fibre, I can't eat almost no nuts & seeds 😊 

If, on the other hand, you lower the amount of carbs in your diet and increase the amount of fats, your body will go into a state known as ketosis. This is the source of the name 'ketogenic' in 'ketogenic diet’. In this state, your liver will break fats in your diet down and produce ketones, an energy source. Your body would pretty much rather use glucose as a primary source of energy but, when forced to look for an alternative, it will resort to burning fat instead.
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