A word of warning: be very wary of “keto” or “low carb” versions of cakes, cookies, chocolate bars, candies, ice cream, and other sweets. They might maintain people’s cravings for a sugary taste, and can make you eat more than you need. They are often full of sugar alcohols – that can raise your blood sugar – and artificial sweeteners, whose health impacts are not yet known. Weight loss may also stall or slow. Learn more
I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer. 

Over the past several decades, research on low-fat diets has evolved. Since releasing its infamous review, Time has released follow-up articles that suggest cholesterol and fat may not be as bad as originally thought. The recent popularity of high-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet, have helped this long-despised macronutrient gain some positive traction. Still, there exist many myths and misconceptions around the ketogenic diet.

However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.


Believe it or not, though, there are some fruits you can still incorporate into a keto meal plan with a little strategy. “In order to stay in the altered metabolic state of ketosis, most people will only be able to consume 20 to 50 grams of net carbs per day,” says Ginger Hultin, R.D., spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That means you’ll have to carefully portion out and track your fruit intake to make sure it fits into your total carb allowance for the day. “An apple, for example, contains about 20 grams of net carbs, so eating just one could max out all of your carbohydrates for the day,” she explains.
Prior to your response, I did make a cheesecake, using your recipe for the filling (so delish, and I received all favorable comments on it). Due to the cost difference between almond and coconut flour, I did find a recipe similar to the one you shared in your response, 1/2 C melted butter (1 stick) whisked until fully blended with 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp vanilla. Then slowly mix in 3/4 C sifted coconut flour. Kneaded for about a minute, adding coconut flour until not sticky. I simply then pressed crust into only the bottom portion of the springform pan, used a fork to punch multiple holes in it, then baked at 400° for 10 minutes. I let it fully cool before adding filling, then used your perfect instructions to bake the cheesecake. Love, love, love this recipe. I’m a happy Type-II Diabetic!
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
I only wish I could make a crust a bit.. crustier? I’ve had a lot of these types of deserts with the mostly-almond-flour crusts, and they always have a bit of a texture issue. No real crunch. But I will experiment. I once made applie pie crumb topping with almond flour, butter, Erythritol and cinnamon, with a little coconut flour, and baked it in a pan, then crumbled it up. I had a lot more Erythritol in that though, and it got “crispy”. Might try a variation on that for this next time.
This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.
Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your diet should be comprised of fat, registered dietitian Stacey Mattinson told Everyday Health. Then, about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight is allowed. To determine carb allowance, Mattinson explained that you need to determine the net carbs. This can be done by subtracting fiber from a food’s total carbohydrates.
Time to address the elephant in the room. Rhubarb is not a fruit. Or at least, rhubarb fails the eye test at first glance. It looks like red celery. When raw, it feels like celery. Hard, bitter, fibrous, and about as enjoyable as a spoonful of cough syrup. Except, that’s not rhubarb at all. Rhubarb measures like a vegetable but tastes like a fruit. It cooks like a fruit and fits the sweet profile you may be craving on a Tuesday night. Reduce 4 ounces of chopped rhubarb with 4 ounces of strawberries, and you have sweet fruit topping that barely skims 9 grams of net carbs, or roughly 4.5 net carbs per serving.
This cheesecake is in the oven baking as we speak. I did use crushed pecans with some cinnamon added along with your other ingredients. The filling looks and tastes AMAZING (I know, I know, it has raw eggs in it). I was about to give up on Keto because quite frankly every recipe I tried just wasnt tasting great. Then I found your site! I also made some of the caramel sauce and I must say that is fantastic all on it’s own. Thank you so much for sharing your recipes! I look forward to making many more.
Berries are among the most popular fruits on ketogenic diets. It's easy to throw them into smoothies, integrate them into desserts or even eat half a serving as a snack. Keto-friendly berries include blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, cranberries and currants. Of course, not all berries are created equal, as their sugar and carb content may differ.
Nuts are a great source of fat, and can be a great keto snack. However, it is easy to go overboard. Most nuts are calorically dense, so they can be easy to over-consume. On more than one occasion, I have found myself sitting next to the jar of nuts and “just having a few more”. Before I was aware, I had probably consumed 800 extra calories of nuts! Depending on your goals, consuming nuts in excess can hinder your progress. That’s not to say that nuts are off limits, though. Instead, portion out single servings beforehand. Avoid sitting down with the entire container. This goes for every other snack, but I feel that nuts are one of the easiest things to overeat.

To make this Tasty Cheese Shelled Keto Chicken Quesadillas, your preheat oven to 400 F. Then, cover a pizza pan with Parchment Paper (NOT wax paper). Mix the Cheeses together, then evenly spread them over the parchment paper (in a circle shape). Bake the cheese shell for 5 minutes. Pour off any extra oil as soon as it comes out of the oven. Then, place the chicken over half of the cheese shell.  Add the sliced peppers, diced tomato and the chopped green onion. Fold the Cheese shell in half over the chicken and veggies. Press it firmly, then return it to the oven for another 4- 5 minutes. Serve with sour cream, salsa and guacamole. Garnish with chopped fresh basil, parsley or cilantro.
As any ketogenic dieter knows, the lifestyle requires a lot of diligence. Even snacking on a banana could ruin your diet. The main goal of keto is to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy, a process known as ketosis. Generally, keto dieters eat lots of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and just 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day to maintain ketosis. For context, that's about half a medium bagel.
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!) 
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