The ideal keto fruit is a high-fat, low-carb fruit. The two obvious choices here are coconut and avocado. Looking at ketogenic diet plans, you'll always see fat — that's the whole point of the diet, after all. However, it's important to diversify your fats. Don't always opt for milk products; instead, try swapping your whole milk for coconut milk or trading your butter for avocado butter.
Certain types of dairy can be enjoyed on the keto diet! Butter, cheese, full fat yogurts and heavy cream – this is not your typical diet fare! When eating dairy, you will generally want to choose ingredients that have a lower amount of lactose. Lactose is a sugar that will spike your blood sugar. You will want to stay away from milk, as it is full of lactose (aka sugar)! And of course, if you have lactose intolerance you should avoid dairy altogether.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.

Hi Fariba, Yes, you’d need more of the crust for sure, probably about 25% more (multiply the amount of each ingredient in the crust by 1.25). For the filling, you could probably keep it the same to avoid messing with conversions, and the cheesecake would just be a shorter height. Some recipes use sour cream for texture or moisture, but this recipe doesn’t need it.
Yes, they're technically a fruit, but we think olives deserve a shout-out all of their own, since they're also a great source of healthy fats and are one of a few keto-approved packaged foods. Plus, they're a great source of antioxidants, will satisfy your craving for something salty, and are blissfully low-carb. “About a palm's worth only has 3 grams of net carbs,” Sarah Jadin, RD, told Health in a previous interview.
My main reason for contacting is the problem I may have with chewing sugar free chewing gum ( two packs a day )whilst on this diet. I need to chew most of the time to somewhat disguise the constant spasming to my mouth. Can you suggest a chewing gum that is suitable whilst on this diet? Thank you for the information and references you have provided. If you know of anything regards this diet and dystonia, I would be most grateful.
An alternative way to get your sweet fix in a keto-friendly diet is through fruit shakes or milkshakes. You can make your own shakes and use alternative, keto-friendly sweeteners or purchase premade shake mixes. The Atkins diet shakes, for instance, are low-carbohydrate, protein-rich shakes available in a variety of sweet flavors (anything from French vanilla to strawberry).
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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