Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.

Still iffy about certain fruits? Double check the carbohydrate counts in a nutrition database to make sure your fruit of choice is not too sugary. The carb counts can really creep up on you if you don’t track and measure. Be careful! Don’t let your sweet tooth take over your portion control or you will kick your cute little butt right out of ketosis.


Oatmeal is something we all miss when it starts to get cold outside, but it is filled with carbs. You can easily make your own oatmeal by following one of the many recipes online. Or, if you’d like a different twist on oatmeal, give our Cinnamon Roll Oatmeal a try. Using what you might think are strange ingredients (cue cauliflower), you get an absolutely delicious faux oatmeal.
Over the past several decades, research on low-fat diets has evolved. Since releasing its infamous review, Time has released follow-up articles that suggest cholesterol and fat may not be as bad as originally thought. The recent popularity of high-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet, have helped this long-despised macronutrient gain some positive traction. Still, there exist many myths and misconceptions around the ketogenic diet.
This strict restriction in carbohydrates means that a lot of foods need to be eliminated. Foods that are normally considered healthy, like fruits, have a high carb content — and the general rule is that the higher the number of carbohydrates the less of that food you can have on a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this means that many otherwise healthy, high-carb fruits, like apples and bananas, must be eliminated, eaten rarely or eaten only in very small amounts.

On the flip side, the keto diet takes most fruits off the table (no pun intended) since they are loaded with sugar and carbohydrates. But we understand that you might find yourself craving something sweet and juicy every once in awhile. Not to worry: there are still some low-carb fruits that you can occasionally treat yourself to (remember that avocado is technically a fruit!). Key word here is occasionally!

When your body is low in potassium, it comes with an array of possible side effects, including: high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. Getting plenty of potassium in your diet can possibly prevent you from developing one of these health issues. Potassium may also help improve your cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).

Lower-carb veggies, like cucumber, celery, asparagus, squash, and zucchini; cruciferous veggies, like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts; nightshades, like eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers; root vegetables, like onion, garlic, and radishes, and sea veggies, like nori and kombu. The guidelines are simple: focus on dark, leafy greens, then the stuff that grows above the ground, then root vegetables.


As for all the other nutrients in meat? If you’re eating enough meat to get your protein, you’ll probably get enough of those, too. For example, that 4 ounces of chuck roast contains 113% of the RDA for vitamin B12, plus substantial amounts of other B vitamins, like choline. For people without special nutritional needs, it’s just not necessary to worry about it beyond that.
Your body needs micro-nutrition and phyto-nutrition. Micro-nutrition is the vitamins and minerals found in both plants and animals, but phyto-nutrition is the special compounds found only in plants. Phyto means light, so it is the nutrition plants make from light using photosynthesis. Some of these compounds create the color or flavor of the plant. Some plants naturally have more of these special compounds than others, for example the bright yellow root, and cooking spice, turmeric contains curcumin. This phyto-nutrient has a potent anti-inflammatory effect. Some countries have already approved its use in the treatment of cancer.
Milk (only small amounts of raw, full-fat milk is allowed). Milk is not recommended for several reasons. Firstly, all the dairy products, milk is difficult to digest, as it lacks the "good" bacteria (eliminated through pasteurization) and may even contain hormones. Secondly, it is quite high in carbs (4-5 grams of carbs per 100 ml). For coffee and tea, replace milk with cream in reasonable amounts. You may have a small amount of raw milk but be aware of the extra carbs. Lastly, farmers in the United States use genetically engineered bovine growth hormone (rBGH). rBGH is injected to dairy cows to increase milk production. Opt for full-fat dairy labeled “NO rBGH”.

Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.

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