The typical carb count in nuts and seeds is about 12.6 grams for every 28 grams at the highest and 3.5 grams for every 28 grams at the lowest. You’re probably thinking: that’s pretty high, but most of this carbohydrate content comes in the form of fiber, which body cannot digest. It passes through your intestines without being digested and goes into bulking up your stool for easier passage when you answer Mother Nature’s Call.
Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.
If you didn’t already hear all the buzz surrounding going keto, now’s the time to get familiarized with the trend. The ketogenic diet, or keto for short, is centered around eating high fat, moderate protein, and super-low-carb foods so that your body begins burning through your fat stores rather than glucose for energy. Essentially, you eat loads of fat from foods such as cheese, bacon, and coconut oil—and get lean! (Psst: it’s also how Kourtney Kardashian and Halle Berry keep trim and toned.)
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “

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