Rich in gut-happy bacteria, yogurt is a great way to add a little sweetness to a Keto diet. Although you can find Greek or low carb coconut yogurts on many grocery store shelves, why not get creative and make your own? It’s easy as pie and delicious homemade yogurt will be a fabulous addition to the recipes featured on our list of top Keto-friendly yogurt dishes!
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Nutrients often work synergistically in nature. For this reason, when the monounsaturated fats in avocados are paired with foods containing lycopene and beta-carotene they can actually increase the absorption of these antioxidants into the body. Monounsaturated fats also significantly decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels (23).  Avocados are one of the amazing ketogenic foods I eat every day!
While Yoplait is known for its dessert-flavored yogurts—a high-sugar snack that doesn’t make the cut while on keto—its newest addition tops our nutritional charts. Unlike other dairy yogurts, YQ by Yoplait drastically reduces its carb count by ultra-filtering the milk. This removes 99 percent of the lactose (a type of sugar), so you still get gut-loving probiotics with almost zero carbs.
Artichoke, asparagus, bok choy and celery are all excellent for adding crunch and texture to salads or sides. Arugula, lettuce, cucumber, watercress and other salad leaves add fresh green nutrition to your meal. Eggplant is an excellent source of a potent anti-oxidants found just under its purple skin. Roast eggplant with oil, spices and sesame seed paste is a traditional Arabian dish called baba ganoush which has a deep creamy flavor and is perfect for keto! Snow peas, peppers and okra can also be enjoyed, but in moderation. Green and above ground plants are typically very low carb vegetables high in fiber and densely nutritious!

Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
Never before has so much attention been given to the healing and beneficial effects of plants. Study after study is confirming that plants have medicinal power. Some, like turmeric, rival modern pharmaceuticals in their ability to fight infection and even treat cancer. With the added bonus of working holistically with your body without side-effects. Plants reduce inflammation, support detoxification and generally improve your health!

There’s actually a name for that way of eating: dirty keto. Instead of focusing on healthy fats like avocado and olive oil, it essentially allows for anything that fits within your daily allotment of carbs (usually around 20-50 grams). If the below foods are part of your ketogenic diet, then you’re not eating as clean as you think — and you’re definitely not eating Bulletproof. Keep reading to see which foods you should get rid of — and why.
Haven’t heard of The ketogenic diet (often called keto)?  It’s a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares similarities to paleo, Whole30, and Atkins. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. When your body switches to burning fat for its primary fuel source, that’s when you hit ketosis. While on the Keto diet you’re supposed to get at least 70 percent of your calories from fat, 15 to 25 percent from protein, and 10 percent from carbohydrates. You’re supposed to avoid all grains, legumes, root vegetables, fruit, (except berries) and sugar.
Just wanted to say thank you! I followed this recipe and if you would’ve served me this at a restaurant I wouldn’t know the difference between this and regular cheesecake! Some minor changes I did only because of the ingredients I had available were to use coconut flour vs almond flour, stevia packs (converted) vs. erythritol for both crust and batter, and just a small amount of almond milk to get the right consistency for the crust. For anyone who may need it, for every cup of almond flour I substituted 1/4 cup (or 2 ounces weighed) of coconut flour. Along with the almond milk, I increased the amount of butter used by about 1 tbsp since coconut flour really sucks up moisture. After that, I followed everything else listed including directions and was not disappointed. Although I used an incorrect pan type(only 2inch high 9inch solid baking pan) so I wasn’t the prettiest cheesecake, it was still delicious which is honestly all I cared about. I might also add that this is the first time I’ve ever baked cheesecake (or any type of baking) of any type, so for anyone who might think it’s difficult, give it a try!

Just wanted to say thank you! I followed this recipe and if you would’ve served me this at a restaurant I wouldn’t know the difference between this and regular cheesecake! Some minor changes I did only because of the ingredients I had available were to use coconut flour vs almond flour, stevia packs (converted) vs. erythritol for both crust and batter, and just a small amount of almond milk to get the right consistency for the crust. For anyone who may need it, for every cup of almond flour I substituted 1/4 cup (or 2 ounces weighed) of coconut flour. Along with the almond milk, I increased the amount of butter used by about 1 tbsp since coconut flour really sucks up moisture. After that, I followed everything else listed including directions and was not disappointed. Although I used an incorrect pan type(only 2inch high 9inch solid baking pan) so I wasn’t the prettiest cheesecake, it was still delicious which is honestly all I cared about. I might also add that this is the first time I’ve ever baked cheesecake (or any type of baking) of any type, so for anyone who might think it’s difficult, give it a try!
The question of what kinds of fat one should eat is still pretty much unresolved. What we know today for sure is this: It doesn’t really matter how much fat you eat, so long as you don’t eat too many calories. (Fats contain 9 calories per gram, compared to carbs and protein, which each have 4.) We also know that trans fats are bad, and we kinda-sorta think that unsaturated fats might be better than saturated fats. Beyond this, we can’t say too much for sure. In terms of food trends, it doesn’t really matter because fads are rarely backed by concrete fact.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
×