Over the past several decades, research on low-fat diets has evolved. Since releasing its infamous review, Time has released follow-up articles that suggest cholesterol and fat may not be as bad as originally thought. The recent popularity of high-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet, have helped this long-despised macronutrient gain some positive traction. Still, there exist many myths and misconceptions around the ketogenic diet.


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We hope this list helps you figure out which meats are optimal for your daily diet planning. We are working on creating a printable version of this, so check back with us for that. We would love to hear your thoughts on this, so please leave us a comment below. If you have a favorite cut of meat that we left off this list, let us know what it is. We can add it to the calculator and see what score it gets. 

Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.
Whether you’re whipping them into a recipe or snacking on a handful of them raw, blackberries can make a great addition to your keto meal plan. A ½-cup serving doesn’t contain much fat (less than ½ g) but is also low in net carbs, with just 3.1 g. The same serving size offers 3.8 g of fiber (15.2 percent DV) and 3.5 g of sugar. Blackberries also provide potassium, with 117 mg (2.5 percent DV) per ½-cup serving. It has 15.1 mg of vitamin C (25.2 percent DV) and 14.3 mg of vitamin K (17.9 percent DV). This fruit is also a great snack for weight loss, containing about 31 cal per ½ cup.
There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.

Hi Maya! I only have 2 options for sweetener on hand: Sweet-Leaf powdered Stevia, or Truvia Baking Blend. Which do you think would turn out best? The Truvia is granulated, but its made from Erythritol and seems like I can use larger quantities of it. The Sweet-leaf container says I should use MUCH less, but it’s powdered. This is my first time baking using sugar alternatives and I’m just not sure which would be better!

Coffee contains chlorogenic acid that produces anti-inflammatory responses in the body and lowers blood sugar levels making it one of the great ketogenic foods. Herbal teas provide various benefits from stimulating bile flow for a healthy liver to increasing detoxification processes. (58)  You can also try bone broth coffee for a great tasting, high protein coffee flavored beverage.

Hi Sean, peanuts are legumes. Firstly, although they are relatively low in carbs, peanuts contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. Also, legumes in general have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. Having said that, many people eat peanuts when following a keto diet and experience none of these issues. You have to try what works best for you.
Essential fatty acids (the omegas) provide core functions to the human body, but they are often times out of balance when on a standard diet. On keto, with a little bit of preparation, your omega fatty acids are easily manageable. If you want to know more about essential fatty acids, omegas, and how they interact with our body on a ketogenic diet, you can read more here >
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
On the flip side, the keto diet takes most fruits off the table (no pun intended) since they are loaded with sugar and carbohydrates. But we understand that you might find yourself craving something sweet and juicy every once in awhile. Not to worry: there are still some low-carb fruits that you can occasionally treat yourself to (remember that avocado is technically a fruit!). Key word here is occasionally!
To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.
Peanuts are technically a legume, not a nut. However, I find them to be a delicious keto snack, especially peanut butter. Peanut butter is one of the easiest things for me to overconsume, personally. The carb count of peanuts is on the higher end, so it’s important to watch the serving size if your goal is to stick to keto. My suggestion is to always measure out a serving of peanuts or peanut butter before consuming.
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
If you didn’t already hear all the buzz surrounding going keto, now’s the time to get familiarized with the trend. The ketogenic diet, or keto for short, is centered around eating high fat, moderate protein, and super-low-carb foods so that your body begins burning through your fat stores rather than glucose for energy. Essentially, you eat loads of fat from foods such as cheese, bacon, and coconut oil—and get lean! (Psst: it’s also how Kourtney Kardashian and Halle Berry keep trim and toned.)
Strawberries have also been found to improve blood sugar levels, reduce insulin levels, increase insulin sensitivity when compared to groups that did not consume berries. This suggests that the combination of consuming strawberries and following the keto diet may have particularly profound effects for those with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.
Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).
Walnuts are 65% fat, most of which is the polyunsaturated kind. In fact, walnuts contain more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than other nuts, particularly the brain-boosting omega-3 fatty acids that studies show we should eat more [7]. Unfortunately, omega-3s easily become rancid quickly. To prevent rancidity, keep walnuts in a cool, dry place or in the fridge.
When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.

Yogurt topped with a few nuts might seem like a no-brainer keto snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you opt for flavored yogurt, like vanilla, that carb count doubles to 24 grams of carbohydrates for 6 ounces. Your best bet is to choose plain Greek yogurt, which has as little as five grams of carbohydrates for a 7 ounce serving. 

Mainly for health reasons, avoid soy products apart from a few non-GMO fermented products which are known for their health benefits. Also avoid wheat gluten which may be used in low-carb foods. When you give up bread, you shouldn't eat any part of it. Beware of BPA-lined cans. If possible, use naturally BPA-free packaging like glass jars or make your own ingredients such as ghee, ketchup, coconut milk or mayonnaise. BPA has been linked to many negative health effects such as impaired thyroid function and cancer. Other additives to avoid: carrageenan (e.g. almond milk products), MSG (e.g. in some whey protein products) and sulfites (e.g. in dried fruits, gelatin).
I’ve about lost my mind over this one. It tastes the most like the real think I’ve tried. I’ve made it three times in 2 weeks and sent it to everyone I know who is low carb. Made it with and without the crust and it’s awesome both ways. Made minis the first time -awesome! I had a minor tweak because I ran out of Swerve. I used 1 cup of that and 1/4 cup splenda plus I doubled the lemon. So, so good. Thank you!

Maya! I have made this about 6 times and my family and friends flip over it. I hand wrote on the printed recipe: “Freakin-Awesome!!!” My 17 year old son saw my note and chuckled. We pour pure blueberry, cherry or pomegranate juice that’s cold pressed on top when we have company. Thank you for a really great recipe. We’re on the plant paradox diet and this is very good to have. 🙂
Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
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