When you have too much bad bacteria in your gut, you’ll usually suffer from uncomfortable digestive issues and other irritating symptoms such as bloating, constipation, candida overgrowth and bladder infections. To combat these unwanted side effects, rebalancing your gut bacteria levels is necessary so that you have a healthy mix of good and bad bacteria.
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
How can you promise that when everything seems to need to be handmade? That is either a major time commitment, shopping, prepping, cooking, cleaning, or the most basic-bland thing ever. This would all be very good for me, but I don’t see how it is feasibly sustainable. Everyone seems to say things like ‘oh it only takes an hour’. All I can think is, wow you have an hour for this every meal? That and I live by myself and fresh food goes bad quickly, that gets really expensive really quickly or requires that you go to the store every other day. I really want to do this long term, but please, how is it realistically possible? I don’t want every meal to mean that I have to clean a pot, a pan, 2 knives, a stirring spoon, a cutting board, etc etc.
With the higher levels of antioxidants found in matcha tea, this smoothie is guaranteed to get your day off to a healthy start! It is thickened with chia seeds and would make a lovely refreshing drink for breakfast. Some green smoothies can be quite a vibrant color, but this one is a more gentle shade, so not as off-putting for green smoothie novices!
I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.
The beauty of The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet is that it's completely opposite of the majority of "lose-weight quick" weight loss scams. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet focuses on FAT LOSS, not weight loss (the difference is explained in the Program Guide). You'll be eating anti-inflammatory foods that promote a healthy, a fast metabolism, and stimulates fat-burning hormones. You'll lose a lot of weight and inches in a short period of time and this time...you'll keep it off.
Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!

According to many keto experts, the best fruits to eat on the keto diet are low-sugar and low-carb berries like raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries, while some fruits to absolutely avoid include pineapple, mangoes, and oranges. The overall consensus? Fruit should be eaten in moderation and according to their net carbs, which you can find more in-depth info on here.
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
Regarding sugar alcohols, there is a big difference between erythritol and other sugar alcohols like xylitol. The difference is that erythritol gets absorbed in the small intestine, but then poorly metabolized. In contrast, xylitol and other sugar alcohols don’t get absorbed at all and continue to the large intestine, which is where they can cause stomach pain or other digestive issues for some people. Since erythritol doesn’t make it to the large intestine in the majority of people, it rarely causes stomach upset. No one I know has had this side effect from erythritol alone. Sure, it’s possible, but at that point there are lots of other foods that cause stomach upset in a small number of people. Of course you know your family best. 🙂
I only wish I could make a crust a bit.. crustier? I’ve had a lot of these types of deserts with the mostly-almond-flour crusts, and they always have a bit of a texture issue. No real crunch. But I will experiment. I once made applie pie crumb topping with almond flour, butter, Erythritol and cinnamon, with a little coconut flour, and baked it in a pan, then crumbled it up. I had a lot more Erythritol in that though, and it got “crispy”. Might try a variation on that for this next time.

You can cut the carb count in half since some of the sugars are consumed by active cultures. The number of carbs and sugar on the label do not take the fermentation process into account. To be absolutely sure that yogurt (in general or a new brand you’d like to try) isn’t affecting your attempts to stay in ketosis, you’ll need to monitor your ketone levels when you eat yogurt at first.

I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.
This was my first time ever making cheesecake, so I was intimidated by the idea of making one without traditional ingredients for crust..etc. However, this recipe was extremely simple to follow and the ingredients weren’t hard to find. I followed each step to a T and my cheesecake came out perfectly! It tasted delicious and I cant wait to let everyone, (including non keto eaters) taste this perfect recipe! I’ll be saving this recipe forever!!
FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets!  And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar! 

Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
×