The gist of the eating plan? Taking in so few carbs sends your body into ketosis—a state of burning fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates or sugars, explains Beth Warren, RDN, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Secrets of a Kosher Girl: A 21-Day Nourishing Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great (Even If You're Not Jewish). In order to stay in ketosis, you only consume 5% to 10% of your calories from carbohydrates—which for most followers is fewer than 20 grams total per day—and instead eat moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of fat.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.
When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.
Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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