That's why keto die-hards are notorious for eating plenty of bacon and cheese. However, if you're tired of eating the same bunless cheeseburger every night, there are plenty of meat-based fat sources you likely haven't tried. Get creative and make one of these five fatty cuts of meat for dinner. Of course, it's best not to go overboard and eat these for every meal–most dietitians recommend getting healthy fats from plant-based sources like nuts and avocado.
If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.

Hi there, I haven’t tried this recipe with xylitol or stevia, but either one should work. For the xylitol, you can use almost the same amount as the erythritol, maybe just scant measuring cups. (Xylitol is just slightly sweeter than erythritol.) For the stevia, it will depend on the brand, because some are more concentrated than others. I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use, which include xylitol and several brands of stevia. If you use a granulated sweetener like xylitol in the filling, run it through a food processor or high-power blender for a few minutes first, to make it powdered. By the way, it’s very thoughtful of you to make this cheesecake for your husband’s birthday! 🙂


Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.

Keto is a lot more than a big pile of bacon – you don’t even need to eat meat at every meal to get enough protein for keto. Eggs are a great staple protein source, and low-carb dairy foods like cheese can give you a boost in the protein department. Getting high-quality protein at every meal is a good practice in general, especially for weight loss, but it doesn’t take any more meat than most people normally eat at a serving.
Just wanted to say thank you! I followed this recipe and if you would’ve served me this at a restaurant I wouldn’t know the difference between this and regular cheesecake! Some minor changes I did only because of the ingredients I had available were to use coconut flour vs almond flour, stevia packs (converted) vs. erythritol for both crust and batter, and just a small amount of almond milk to get the right consistency for the crust. For anyone who may need it, for every cup of almond flour I substituted 1/4 cup (or 2 ounces weighed) of coconut flour. Along with the almond milk, I increased the amount of butter used by about 1 tbsp since coconut flour really sucks up moisture. After that, I followed everything else listed including directions and was not disappointed. Although I used an incorrect pan type(only 2inch high 9inch solid baking pan) so I wasn’t the prettiest cheesecake, it was still delicious which is honestly all I cared about. I might also add that this is the first time I’ve ever baked cheesecake (or any type of baking) of any type, so for anyone who might think it’s difficult, give it a try! 

Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Beware of added sugars or high-glycemic sweeteners in spice blends or condiments, but other than that, it’s fair game for keto. In spice-heavy dishes, carbs can add up, but don’t drive yourself crazy worrying about your teaspoon of turmeric. Check labels for additives like sugars, milk solids, potato starch, corn starch, or MSG, or make your own blends at home. Table salt often contains undisclosed fillers and anti-caking agents, so it’s best to opt for sea salt or Himalayan pink salt instead.
Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
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