In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.
It’s definitely not for everyone, lol! We prefer to focus on all the delicious, nutrient-dense real foods we can have instead of thinking about the foods we try to avoid. We’ve actually never felt restricted while living a keto lifestyle (take a look at our Recipes page and you’ll see what we mean). We noticed that when we nourish ourselves, our health improves and we feel better in so many different ways. We wish you success in whatever lifestyle works best for you!
Hi Justin, I’m glad you liked the cheesecake! This definitely doesn’t have 18g net carbs per slice – you can see that even at a glance since all the ingredients are very low carb (almond flour, cream cheese, eggs, erythritol, etc.) The nutrition label included below the recipe card shows the nutrition breakdown per slice. In MyFitnessPal, did you set the number of servings for the recipe to 16? If it was set to something else, that could be one reason for the number to be significantly off like that.

Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.

I’ve made this before for my husband’s birthday a few weeks ago and it was a huge hit! I’m wanting to make it again but realized that I’m out of vanilla extract for this time around. I have coffee, lemon, cinnamon, and peppermint extracts. What would you recommend as a vanilla extract substitute? I’m out of almond extract too.. How much to use also?


The recipe as-is is sugar-free but does not use any stevia, only erythritol. You could use stevia, but the amount would need to be different – I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use. Pure stevia is also sugar-free and does not have any calories that humans are able to absorb. But, it’s very concentrated and many stevia products contain fillers. Depending on what brand you used, other ingredients may not be sugar-free (for example, some use maltodextrin as a filler, which is actually sugar). I recommend looking at my sweetener guide for comparison, and read the ingredients label on the product you have.
The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.

This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!


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Not only is this a low-carb recipe, but coconut yogurt is also vegan-friendly and can be so useful for a quick dish at breakfast time. Simply mix the two ingredients, cover the bowl and wait! It could not be easier! This yogurt can be mixed with fruit puree, topped with nuts if you can tolerate them, or flavored with vanilla. It can also be stirred into a spicy dish to reduce the heat.
Your macro goals on the keto diet will focus on eating minimal amounts of carbs, adequate amounts of protein (enough to maintain your lean body mass), and the rest of your nutritional needs will be met with fat. This includes fat from your body and fat from your plate. If your goal is fat loss, the fat from your dietary fat intake will be limited a bit to create a calorie deficit so your body fat stores can be burned for energy. That’s the basis of most keto calculators!
By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!)
Peak, a Portland, Oregon-based keto yogurt brand, has gone one step further, producing a vanilla yogurt with 16 percent fat and a plain variety with 17 percent. I was not able to find Peak in stores, but the company was gracious enough to ship me a case in dry ice. During the week it took to arrive, I found myself libidinous for the lipidinous good stuff. Would it really taste as good as my long-lost Liberté?
As mentioned earlier, the keto diet takes carbs intake into consideration. And if you look at carbs found in yogurt, you will find that yogurt, of many types, have lots of carbs. Strawberry yogurt, for instance, has around 33 grams of carbs, which is more than recommended 20g of carbs per meal to be in shape – and less than 20g per meal to lose weight.
Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).
Coffee contains chlorogenic acid that produces anti-inflammatory responses in the body and lowers blood sugar levels making it one of the great ketogenic foods. Herbal teas provide various benefits from stimulating bile flow for a healthy liver to increasing detoxification processes. (58)  You can also try bone broth coffee for a great tasting, high protein coffee flavored beverage. 

As mentioned earlier, the keto diet takes carbs intake into consideration. And if you look at carbs found in yogurt, you will find that yogurt, of many types, have lots of carbs. Strawberry yogurt, for instance, has around 33 grams of carbs, which is more than recommended 20g of carbs per meal to be in shape – and less than 20g per meal to lose weight.

Here is another tasty low-carb and sugar-free recipe for a healthy, sweet treat you can enjoy any time! You end up with a frozen yogurt popsicle which can be flavored whatever way you like – use fresh berries or natural extracts to make your favorite! There are many different types of lolly molds on the market, but you can make these in an ice-cube tray if you don’t want to buy the equipment.
Keep in mind that all nuts contain lots of fat and calories (plus some protein and minerals) – they are very nutritious. Eating nuts is fine if you’re doing so when you’re hungry and need energy. But if you’re just snacking on them between meals – without being hungry – because the nuts taste good or because you’re bored, then you’re adding tons of fat that you don’t need.
Oatmeal is something we all miss when it starts to get cold outside, but it is filled with carbs. You can easily make your own oatmeal by following one of the many recipes online. Or, if you’d like a different twist on oatmeal, give our Cinnamon Roll Oatmeal a try. Using what you might think are strange ingredients (cue cauliflower), you get an absolutely delicious faux oatmeal.
Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
Peanuts are technically a legume, not a nut. However, I find them to be a delicious keto snack, especially peanut butter. Peanut butter is one of the easiest things for me to overconsume, personally. The carb count of peanuts is on the higher end, so it’s important to watch the serving size if your goal is to stick to keto. My suggestion is to always measure out a serving of peanuts or peanut butter before consuming.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Because you are using active ingredients in this recipe, it is important that you clean the equipment well before you start, but this can be done easily by soaking them in boiling water. This low-carb recipe uses live yogurt to start the culture process, and any plain one will do. Once the yogurt is ready you can serve it with berries or use it to make delicious creamy sauces.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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