So up through the ’90s, the thinking went: “Fats are bad and carbs are fine.” This began to change with the Atkins diet, which rose to fame at the end of the decade as a quick-fix way to lose lots of weight. According to the wisdom of Dr. Robert Atkins, carbs were actually bad and fats were actually fine. His logic led my grandpa to eat pork rinds for a year. It also caused a plunge in the sale of bread and brought difficult times to doughnut seller Krispy Kreme.
I just took it out of the oven, & it smells WONDERFUL. I am having one issue though. After 45 min. in the oven, it was beautifully golden on the edges, perfectly smooth on top, & a bit jiggly in the middle. I gently sat it on the cool, glass stovetop. Within 3 min, it started developing deep cracks. i assumed it wasn’t done enough, so I put it in another 10 min. The same thing happened. I’ve double checked the recipe to assure I did it correctly. I did. Any suggestions?
Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.
Note this: When it comes to keto-approved foods, you don't have to spend an arm and a leg. Yes, it's suggested your meats are either grass-fed or cage-free and your seafood wild-caught. For produce, organic is recommended. That said, you will not mess up your chances of achieving ketosis by purchasing farmed or non-organic foods. Do what best fits your budget and goals.
The top three “fruits” on this list hardly exemplify the prototypical image of fruits in our minds, and it should come as no surprise. Fruits are typically banished from everyone’s keto diet shopping list, and for good reason. They simply pack too much sugar, and sugar is what we’re supposed to be avoiding at all costs, right? While this assertion may be true for most fruits, it turns out that there are a few delicious berries that provide very manageable carb content at a reasonable serving size. Two ounces of raspberries every day would certainly be enough for most people. You can always grab another 2oz for a total of 14 grams of net carbs. This will require some macro gymnastics if you’re hoping to enjoy balanced meals for the rest of the day, however.
Hi Viola, Sorry you had issues with the cheesecake. Did you use the exact same ingredients? Did you check the video? I’d be happy to help troubleshoot if you can point to where it went differently for you. As for cracking, this is likely due to either drastic temperature changes or over-baking. Check the tips in the post above. Finally, instructions for the raspberry sauce are in the recipe notes on the recipe card.
Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake.
If you're still not sure what to do, or you're a keto veteran and you're looking for some help, you should check out our coaching program. Ketovangelist coaches live keto all day, every day. We keep up to date on the latest science, too. But more importantly, we focus on your goals to help you achieve success in your keto journey. It's always better to have someone in your corner, guiding you along. So if you're ready for success, sign up for a coach today.
Potential Health Benefits: Improvements in lipid profile. In one study, people with mildly elevated cholesterol consumed 30 grams (1 ounce) of hazelnuts for 4 weeks. By the end of the study, they had significant reductions in total cholesterol and cholesterol: HDL ratio. In addition, they experienced a significant decrease in apo-B, reflecting a reduction in their LDL particle number (16).

The recipe as-is is sugar-free but does not use any stevia, only erythritol. You could use stevia, but the amount would need to be different – I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use. Pure stevia is also sugar-free and does not have any calories that humans are able to absorb. But, it’s very concentrated and many stevia products contain fillers. Depending on what brand you used, other ingredients may not be sugar-free (for example, some use maltodextrin as a filler, which is actually sugar). I recommend looking at my sweetener guide for comparison, and read the ingredients label on the product you have.


Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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