Hi Jewell, Thank you for clarifying. Sorry to hear it was bitter! I’ve never experienced that before, either. Just the opposite, people often comment that this tastes just like a “regular” (not low carb or gluten-free) cheesecake. 🙂 I’m not sure where the bitterness would come from. What sweetener did you use, and did that taste bitter to you at all? Powdered erythritol doesn’t usually have any bitterness, but stevia does tend to have a bitter aftertaste (which is stronger in some brands).
•  Humans unlike true carnivores do not have fangs to tear the flesh while the prey is walking.  We need to marinate it to tenderize and so on which basically indicates we are not carnivore and that eating meat is an acquired taste.  Humans are infatuated with the taste of meat and for long time now we have believed that eating meat is legitimate, a mistake with horrible consequences for animals and us.
In 2018, sales of whole milk and whole-fat yogurt have increased by 1.6 percent and 11.6 percent, respectively, as fat-free yogurt has decreased by 10.9 percent. This shift in taste has birthed a slew of high-fat yogurts. Siggi’s 9 percent Triple Cream first came to market in 2017; it is now available nationwide in markets like Whole Foods, which is where I bought mine.
The ketogenic diet focuses on cutting carb consumption and increasing fat intake to reach ketosis, a metabolic state in which the body begins burning fat for energy when glucose stores are running low. This typically involves decreasing intake of high-carb foods like grains, starches, legumes and sugary snacks while increasing consumption of healthy fats such as coconut oil, olive oil, grass-fed butter and ghee.

Regarding cooking time, unfortunately it sounds like it might have been in the oven for too long. Cheesecake, like all custards, does not fully set in the oven. Please check the instructions – it should still be jiggly when you remove it from the oven. The cheesecake will finish setting when refrigerating for multiple hours after baking. If you keep cooking it longer than it should, it will be dry, crumbly, and likely develop cracks.
Hi Sean, peanuts are legumes. Firstly, although they are relatively low in carbs, peanuts contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. Also, legumes in general have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. Having said that, many people eat peanuts when following a keto diet and experience none of these issues. You have to try what works best for you.

Hi Sarah, Sorry, I don’t have that detail of granularity. The chart is designed to show equivalents if someone has a different type of sweetener, but is not meant to be a way to combine sweeteners. I suppose you could try doing a conversion for half the sweetener amount needed in the recipe, then use half of the original and half of the conversion. I just can’t say for sure if the results would be the same, and it would depend on the recipe. For cheesecake filling it would probably be fine as long as you use either a powdered sweetener (as in powdered erythritol or monk fruit) or super concentrated liquid or powder (as in pure stevia powder/liquid).
Here’s a nutritional list of some of the more commonly consumed vegetables on keto. Keep in mind that the weights are the same of everything listed so that it will impact the skew of the carb counts. For example, in a meal you may have 6 oz. of broccoli in the side, but you would not have 6 oz. worth of berries in the morning. You may mix 6 oz. of berries into a pudding with 4 servings.

Thank you, Erica. Sorry, mascarpone won’t work in a baked cheesecake – it melts into a butter-like consistency when heated. Also, just so you know, mascarpone does not have 0 carbs. Manufacturers get away with writing 0 because they can round down if it’s less than 1 gram per serving. Mascarpone has 0.3 grams carbs per tablespoon, and cream cheese has 0.8 grams per tablespoon.


Seasonings and sauces are a tricky part of ketogenic diet foods, but people use them on a regular basis to add flavor to their meals. The easiest way to remain strict here is to avoid processed foods. There are many low carb condiments and products on the market, and there’s no way to list them all. A handful of them are great, but the majority use high glycemic index sweeteners – which you want to avoid.
To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.

The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
When you have too much bad bacteria in your gut, you’ll usually suffer from uncomfortable digestive issues and other irritating symptoms such as bloating, constipation, candida overgrowth and bladder infections. To combat these unwanted side effects, rebalancing your gut bacteria levels is necessary so that you have a healthy mix of good and bad bacteria.
Again, generally speaking, in proportion to their fat content, nuts are pretty low in carbs. Looking at the examples below, an ounce of the almonds would have about 2.9 grams of net carbs and the same amount of macadamia nuts would have 1.5 grams. It’s important to account for net carbs over total carbs, since nuts contain fiber, which is indigestible. Therefore, net carbs refer to the number that is usable by the body. Check out the Perfect Keto Guide to Net Carbs for more.
Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!)
×