Nuts are high in polyunsaturated fats (often abbreviated to PUFAs). For example, 100 grams of macadamia nuts have 206 mg omega-3 fatty acids and 1296 mg omega-6 fatty acids. Polyunsaturated fats can easily be damaged by heat and once those damaged fats are ingested by us, there’s a chance that it can cause oxidative damage (especially to DNA) in our bodies.
Dehydrated fruit. When fruit is dehydrated, the moisture is removed. This process makes dehydrated fruit more nutrient dense than its fresh counterpart and ensures higher carb and sugar count by weight. Take apricots for example. In 100 grams of raw apricot, there are 9 grams of net carbohydrates. But in 100 grams of dehydrated apricot, the net carb count skyrockets to 82 grams of net carbs. Pretty significant difference, and you’ll see the same thing with plums vs. prunes, raisins, cran-raisins, and all the other dried variety of fruits.  
Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
The nominal amount of carbs allowed on keto makes it challenging to find snacks that won't screw up your diet. But nuts should be a go-to for any keto enthusiast, as they're high in fat without being loaded with too many carbs. If you're looking for the lowest carb nuts, add these to your emergency snack stash so you're prepared when hunger strikes.
Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
Once you add in all the miscellaneous protein you get from nuts, dairy (if you eat dairy), eggs (around 18 grams per 3 eggs, so they’re comparable to meat), and other sources, it’s pretty easy to get plenty of protein with very reasonable amounts of meat. In fact, many people don’t eat more meat on keto than they ate before – they just get rid of all the junk that surrounded the meat.
Why Greek yogurt? Well, if you are not on an absolutely zero-carb diet and don’t mind some dairy, either, you must admit that Greek yogurt is one of the most enjoyable snacks out there. Moreover, it is supposed to be full of the good little guys that help the gut remain healthy. Other than that, it is a soft and fluffy alternative to cream cheese. While I don’t mind the cheese, I do find it can mess with me if I eat too much of it. Besides, I’ve seen people complaining they hated cream cheese pancakes and wanted an alternative. Hopefully, this recipe comes in handy for some of them.
I’ve made this before for my husband’s birthday a few weeks ago and it was a huge hit! I’m wanting to make it again but realized that I’m out of vanilla extract for this time around. I have coffee, lemon, cinnamon, and peppermint extracts. What would you recommend as a vanilla extract substitute? I’m out of almond extract too.. How much to use also?
Thanks for your question. Yes, millet and quinoa are seeds; however, they are much higher in carbs than the seeds discussed in the article. Depending on your carb tolerance and goals, you might be able to include them in your diet in small amounts. But it's my understanding that they wouldn't provide any additional benefit for gut health beyond what the lower-carb seeds and nuts do -- in fact, I'd argue that nuts and seeds would be more beneficial. Most of the carbs in millet and quinoa are digested and absorbed in the small intestine, which wouldn't have any effect on the microbiome. By contrast, most of the carbs in the seeds and nuts I recommend in the article are mainly fiber, including soluble fiber, which does promote gut health. I hope that helps! - Franziska
Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.
These taste so freaking good. I used this filling and the crust/baking directions from the pina colada cheesecake cupcake recipe. The only thing I would change is to make sure to include directions to beat the eggs into the cream cheese/sweetener mixture on the lowest speed to avoid getting air bubbles in there!!! I beat them too fast and ended up with cheesecakes that puffed way up in the oven and the deflated when they cooled and it made the texture a little off. Planning on making them again sometime because they seriously taste amazing and were pretty easy, just sucks because I was making these for graduation and made 2.5 dozen and none turned out right 🙁
If you’re new or just still learning the ropes for the keto diet food list, your biggest questions probably revolve around figuring out just what high-fat low-carb foods you can eat on such a low-carb, ketogenic diet. Overall, remember that the bulk of calories on the keto diet are from foods that are high in natural fats along with a moderate amount of foods with protein. Those that are severely restricted are all foods that provide lots of carbs, even kinds that are normally thought of as “healthy,” like whole grains, for example.

Thus, while nuts and seeds are great to include on a ketogenic diet, it probably would be wise to limit your portions to a serving or two (1–2 oz.) per day. An ounce of nuts is about the size of a small handful. If you want to be even more precise, a serving size is close to: 24 almonds, 18 medium cashews, 12 hazelnuts or filberts, 8 medium Brazil nuts, 12 macadamia nuts, 35 peanuts, 15 pecan halves or 14 English walnut halves.


Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.


OMG this is delicious! My mom used to make us sour cream and sugar sandwiches sometimes when we were little (yes, i know it sounds weird). And this yogurt is literally the exact same thing! But one quick question – how long will this last in the fridge? I was thinking of prepping all my yogurts for the week but didn’t want to get to Wednesday and be sadly disappointed!
I tried your cheesecake with raspberry sauce for Easter and OMG!!! It did crack on me but I could have cared less. It was delicious and no one in my family believed it was sugar free (minus the sugars in the raspberries of course.) My husband, who is a chef, was VERY impressed. The crust was even delicious. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! It will be made every holiday from now on.

Studies have shown intake of polyunsaturated fats, fiber, magnesium, and L-arginine found, all of which are found in nuts, may help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease death, and some inflammation markers in the body. In addition, nuts provide antioxidants that are protective for the body, so this is mostly a concern if you’re eating them in large amounts daily.
Jam doesn’t have to be a thing of the past. You can find low carb fruit preserves in the store (sometimes with added fiber), or you can make your own at home! Spread it on some walnut zucchini bread if you’re craving something a little bit different for breakfast or have it on some keto bread. There are so many different ways you can incorporate it into your keto diet.
So all those great minerals I mentioned above that many nuts contain may be difficult for you to absorb. However, soaking and roasting nuts may reduce the phytic acid content in nuts dramatically. So, if you eat soaked, sprouted or roasted nuts, then this might not be a big problem for you. If you find nuts hard to digest, then this could be due to their high phytic acid content, and soaking nuts before eating them can help make nuts easier to digest and reduce your discomfort when eating them.
Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.
Hi Nanette, For this recipe I recommend a granulated sweetener in the crust and either powdered erythritol or powdered monk fruit in the filling. Pure stevia extract would be very concentrated and may change the end result. A stevia blend may work but the amount would vary depending on which one it is and what else is in it. You can check my sweetener conversion chart which can help if you look up the type you are using.

If you can’t have cheese on clean keto, at least you can have bacon? Well, sort of. Traditional bacon contains those pesky sulfites from before, along with nitrates (aka another carcinogen), Hunnes says. One recent study found a link between nitrate consumption and mania by looking at both humans and rats.[12] And nitrates are a common migraine trigger — one study found that they can actually alter our oral bacteria, which is what can set off the migraines. [13]
If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)
Because the body turns the fat into energy after its carbohydrate stores are depleted, the ketogenic diet has potential weight loss benefits. Research has shown that fats and proteins are the most satiating, while carbohydrates are the least. Because you feel full longer after eating fats and proteins, you reduce the number of calories you eat overall.
How can you promise that when everything seems to need to be handmade? That is either a major time commitment, shopping, prepping, cooking, cleaning, or the most basic-bland thing ever. This would all be very good for me, but I don’t see how it is feasibly sustainable. Everyone seems to say things like ‘oh it only takes an hour’. All I can think is, wow you have an hour for this every meal? That and I live by myself and fresh food goes bad quickly, that gets really expensive really quickly or requires that you go to the store every other day. I really want to do this long term, but please, how is it realistically possible? I don’t want every meal to mean that I have to clean a pot, a pan, 2 knives, a stirring spoon, a cutting board, etc etc.
The problem with some meats when you’re on Keto is that they are too lean. That means, even though it’s low in carbs, some meat has too much protein and not enough fat. That doesn’t mean you can’t have those meats. It just means you’ll need to be careful not to go over your protein macro. And if there isn’t enough fat in the meat you eat, then you will want to pick up some extra, healthy fat somewhere else.
With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.
If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.
One of the most researched benefits, however, is how eating a high-fat diet can treat disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's. There are also potential benefits for some diabetics, as ketosis can help your body regulate its blood sugar. But an overabundance of ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, so those with type 1 diabetes may choose to pursue other dietary options.
Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
×