Smoothies can be very useful to get vitamins and antioxidants into fussy eaters, and ones like this which are packed with flavor can even help anyone recovering from illness as they are so easy to drink and taste great. This low-carb recipe uses blueberries to give a vibrant color, natural sweetness, and fabulous flavor and it can be made with frozen berries which can be sourced quite cheaply!
Hi Jewell, Thank you for clarifying. Sorry to hear it was bitter! I’ve never experienced that before, either. Just the opposite, people often comment that this tastes just like a “regular” (not low carb or gluten-free) cheesecake. 🙂 I’m not sure where the bitterness would come from. What sweetener did you use, and did that taste bitter to you at all? Powdered erythritol doesn’t usually have any bitterness, but stevia does tend to have a bitter aftertaste (which is stronger in some brands).
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Nutrition – If you eat nuts and seeds daily, you minimize your risk of nutrient deficiencies. These foods are, as already explained, nutritional powerhouses. Fat makes up a big portion of the macros in nuts, with most having over 70% of fat per measure of weight. The quality of the fats in nuts is also worth noting as most a rich in monounsaturated fatty acids [2].
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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