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Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
You can have almonds, walnuts, cashews, sunflower seeds, pistachios, chestnuts, and pumpkin seeds. Chia seeds and flaxseeds can also be added to meals, such as a delicious smoothie. Both nuts and seeds are high in fiber, which are going to help you feel fuller longer and more satisfied overall. Nuts are also beneficial because they’ve been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and other ailments. 

How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.

Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
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