Milk—but not cheese—is off the list because it contains a lot of lactose, a form of sugar, which makes it high in carbohydrates. When cheese is made, all the sugar is eaten by bacteria and turned into lactic acid, cutting the carb content way down. Low- and reduced-fat dairy products are to be avoided as they’re overly processed, which strips out nutrients like the fatty acids that make you feel full. Plus, sugar is often added to make up for a loss of flavor and texture, so some actually have more sugar than full-fat dairy. Resist shredded cheese, too, as it contains a carby potato starch that keeps it from sticking together.
Hi Maya. Thanks for your yummy sounding recipes! I have Virtue brand granulated monk fruit with erythritol sweetener. Since the recipe calls for powdered sweetener, can I assume the Swerve conversion is what you’re going by? My sweetener is four times as sweet as sugar, so since Swerve measures 1 to 1, that the recipe would use 1 1/4 cup of real sugar, so I’ll need to divide that amount by 4, then try to make it into powder. Does that sound right? Thanks in advance!
When I first started making homemade, low-carb yogurt, it really surprised me that you can use yogurt to make yogurt! Just add some yogurt to the milk and the magic will happen! Once the yogurt is made, strain through a cloth to achieve thick, Greek-style creamy goodness that you can eat straight or serve with some fruit for a healthy and delicious breakfast.
Wondering what fruits can you eat on keto? When selecting which fruits to include on a ketogenic diet, it’s important to look at the number of net carbs per serving, which is calculated by subtracting the amount of fiber from the total grams of carbohydrates. Need some ideas for which fruits you can use to help get you started? Here are a few of the top choices, plus how many net carbs are found in each serving.
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.

“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley


Instead of adding sugar to your coffee, you can put a few drops of stevia in there to sweeten it up. Stevia is a great sweetener and won’t increase your blood sugar levels – so it’s a perfect way to sweeten your morning coffee. If you find stevia to have a bitter aftertaste, erythritol and monk fruit extract are two other keto-friendly sweeteners worth trying.
Before I let you enjoy this quick and simple (but not just “another-one-out-there”) recipe, I’d like to point out that using full-fat Greek yogurt is important. Xanthan gum, on the other hand, can be an optional ingredient, but I do recommend using it. That way you higher the chances for the fluffy pancakes to gain just the right amount of firmness.
Consuming a higher amount of fat is important on a ketogenic diet, and getting a variety of different fats is recommended.  I often get asked about potential snacks that someone can consume on the go.  As a source of primarily unsaturated (polyunsaturated and monounsaturated) fats, nuts and seeds can be a great choice to include in your daily menu.
So, how do we ensure enough super-plant based nutrition on keto? Fortunately there are loads of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit you can choose from! Let’s start with low carb vegetables - specifically the green ones! The green color in plants is called chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight and turn it into energy. Chlorophyll protects the body from cancer and cleanses the liver. Amazingly, our bodies can also use chlorophyll inside our mitochondria. This is why green juices, made fresh or from powders, give us a rapid natural energy boost. Green leafy plants like Kale, Spinach and Collard Greens reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases. Make sure you eat your greens on keto!
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.

Mushrooms aren’t really a vegetable, they have a kingdom all of their own! The fungi kingdom represents over 5 million different species. Technically, mushrooms are considered to be closer to animals than plants. Edible mushrooms are rich in compounds which boost the immune system. There are loads of new varies becoming readily available in supermarkets, from button, field and shitake to oyster, reishi, and many more. They soak up flavors and add a meaty texture to dishes, they contain very little carb so can be enjoyed in abundance on keto.


There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
Peak, a Portland, Oregon-based keto yogurt brand, has gone one step further, producing a vanilla yogurt with 16 percent fat and a plain variety with 17 percent. I was not able to find Peak in stores, but the company was gracious enough to ship me a case in dry ice. During the week it took to arrive, I found myself libidinous for the lipidinous good stuff. Would it really taste as good as my long-lost Liberté?

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
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