Just when you thought your midnight-snacking of shredded cheese could be considered a healthy habit thanks to keto… (You kid, you knew it was too good to be true all along.) Cheese in general is not recommended on clean keto or the Bulletproof Diet. Dairy proteins are among the worst offenders for allergies and inflammation. If your body doesn’t like casein, your immune system will attack every time you eat it. The reaction may be subtle and chronic, or it could trigger an autoimmune flare-up and other inflammatory conditions. Cheese also harbors tons of toxic mold from the animal’s diet.[11]
Keto is a lot more than a big pile of bacon – you don’t even need to eat meat at every meal to get enough protein for keto. Eggs are a great staple protein source, and low-carb dairy foods like cheese can give you a boost in the protein department. Getting high-quality protein at every meal is a good practice in general, especially for weight loss, but it doesn’t take any more meat than most people normally eat at a serving.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “

Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.

Thank you, Patricia! Typically dropping is due to sudden temperature changes, or from over mixing. Make sure the mixer is at low speed. After baking, let it gradually cool on the counter. If you really want it to be perfect looking, you can try a water bath to encourage even more gradual temperature changes, but for me that’s usually more hassle than it’s worth.


On your keto food list, stick to low-glycemic sweeteners to avoid spikes in blood sugar, and avoid fillers and binders such as maltodextrin and dextrose, which can spike blood sugar and contain sneaky carbs. Sugar alcohols such as maltitol or xylitol may read as no sugar on a label, but be aware that they will still cause moderate glycemic response when digested.
If it’s not obvious already, cottage cheese will be your new keto sidekick. Forget about your friend who said she was going to do it with you– cottage cheese will be there to help out. With tons of recipe varieties you’ll be hooked. Go shopping with our Ultimate Keto Shopping List and  try some of the recipes above and let me know in the comment which your favorites were!
Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe! Our 10 year old granddaughter is T1D and I wanted to make her Thanksgiving super special – and not have her feel as if she couldn’t enjoy all the deliciousness of this day!! So, my friend sent me the link for this cheesecake recipe. MY OH MY!!! It was so very good!!! We all loved it!! I also mashed up some raspberries and we had those over the top. Chloe even got to have some raspberries on hers as her BG was a little low. She devoured this cheesecake and her blood glucose numbers were not affected at all!! NO SPIKES!!
Be aware of the effects of nightshades on your body; while they are permitted in ketosis, they cause inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis in sensitive people. Nightshades include tomatoes, tomatillos, peppers, okra, and eggplant. For a Bulletproof ketosis, also limit onions and garlic, which tend to be moldy and can disrupt your alpha brain waves. Plus, lightly cook any oxalate-heavy cruciferous and leafy greens.[1]
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
Nuts naturally have very few carbohydrates. For example, 100 grams of dry roasted almonds have 7 grams of net carbohydrates, and 100 grams of raw macadamia nuts have 5 grams of net carbohydrates. Foods that are low in carbohydrates are crucial to a ketogenic diet since even a moderate amount of carbohydrate intake will make it very tough to get into or stay in nutritional ketosis.
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
When you have too much bad bacteria in your gut, you’ll usually suffer from uncomfortable digestive issues and other irritating symptoms such as bloating, constipation, candida overgrowth and bladder infections. To combat these unwanted side effects, rebalancing your gut bacteria levels is necessary so that you have a healthy mix of good and bad bacteria.
The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
The problem with some meats when you’re on Keto is that they are too lean. That means, even though it’s low in carbs, some meat has too much protein and not enough fat. That doesn’t mean you can’t have those meats. It just means you’ll need to be careful not to go over your protein macro. And if there isn’t enough fat in the meat you eat, then you will want to pick up some extra, healthy fat somewhere else.
Michelle, I second Libby’s remarks about “The fear of saturated fat is so old fashioned and outdated. Research shows saturated fat is healthy, stable and protective.”. In addition to her link, get a used copy (or new) of Nora Gedgaudas’s book Primal Body Primal Mind. Dr. Eric Berg has put out many youtube videos about Keto and intermittent fasting. Search his name with weight, or keto, or intermittent fasting, or phytic acid. They are some interesting videos.
Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.

This is an amazing cake recipe as it is not only delicious, but it is also sugar and wheat-free and very low in carbohydrates. Using a ring tin not only makes this cake look good, it also helps to ensure the cake cooks evenly all the way through. Drizzle with the frosting and you have a cake that is good enough to serve at a celebration and no-one will believe it’s sugar-free!


“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
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