If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.) 

First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.
Oleuropein has been shown to produce numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial benefits. Olive consumption increases glutathione production in the cardiovascular system and helps to prevent cancer cell growth throughout the body. (34, 33)  Olives and olive oil are great foods to eat on a ketogenic diet.  I like the pitted Kalamata olives here
The official USDA database lists cream cheese as 1.56g of carbs per ounce. Some product labels may round this up or down, but it's actually the same for any full-fat cream cheese regardless of brand. Some calculators round this up to 2g per ounce, which can account for a big difference when extrapolating to the 32 oz needed for this low carb cheesecake recipe.
Thank you, Patricia! Typically dropping is due to sudden temperature changes, or from over mixing. Make sure the mixer is at low speed. After baking, let it gradually cool on the counter. If you really want it to be perfect looking, you can try a water bath to encourage even more gradual temperature changes, but for me that’s usually more hassle than it’s worth.
Polyphenols are a special group of phytochemicals – plant components with antioxidant properties. There are thousands of polyphenol compounds in fruits and vegetables, and examples include flavonoids, coumarins, lignans, tannic acid. By including fruit into your keto diet, you can reap some of the many health benefits of polyphenols like a reduced risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease [4].
You may need to trial a few kinds of cheese to find the best one that will bake to a crispy shell, and each one will vary considerably. I used a regular block of cheese, shredded/grated it, then cooked until I knew it would be crispy when cooled down. The first ones I tried when I was developing this, I discovered I hadn’t cooked them long enough to crisp up.
Legit Halleluj! Made this perfect my 1st attempt & every multiple times following. Also my 1st attempt ever at cheesecake. I think I made it 6 times during recent holidays. Helped me stay on keto during that time!!! Though I still hope to one day find a lower to zero carb cream cheese. One time I swapped cream cheese for Neufchatel cheese as it has fewer carbs (& less fat) but tasted nearly identical. Also, I sub crust to all pecan instead (just ground up raw pecans, butter & erythritol), I’ll have to try to remake one time with your almond crust, if we can pry away from the pecan! **Thank you for your fabulous recipe!!** (I use organic & grass-fed ingredients whenever I can, so it’s always such a bummer when a new recipe doesn’t knock outta the park. But this one does.)
Fruits that are high in fiber. For keto dieters counting net carbohydrates, fiber can be subtracted from total carb count. This exclusion of dietary fiber in the carb count allows for a wider variety of fruit that may be incorporated into your diet. Berries, for example, have a high fiber content and can be enjoyed in moderation on a ketogenic diet.
Whether you munch on them on their own or pair them with melt-in-your-mouth Havarti, Kalamata olives are one of our go-to snacks both on and off keto. Six plump olives boast just 35 calories and 130 milligrams of sodium, a low count to keep bloating at bay. Most of the fat content in olives is monounsaturated, and more specifically oleic acid, which has been linked to anti-inflammatory and heart-protective benefits.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.
Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.
Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.
Be aware of the effects of nightshades on your body; while they are permitted in ketosis, they cause inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis in sensitive people. Nightshades include tomatoes, tomatillos, peppers, okra, and eggplant. For a Bulletproof ketosis, also limit onions and garlic, which tend to be moldy and can disrupt your alpha brain waves. Plus, lightly cook any oxalate-heavy cruciferous and leafy greens.[1]
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
Hi Maya! I only have 2 options for sweetener on hand: Sweet-Leaf powdered Stevia, or Truvia Baking Blend. Which do you think would turn out best? The Truvia is granulated, but its made from Erythritol and seems like I can use larger quantities of it. The Sweet-leaf container says I should use MUCH less, but it’s powdered. This is my first time baking using sugar alternatives and I’m just not sure which would be better!
I made this on Monday, let it sit in the fridge overnight and it was fabulous last night (Tuesday) and still fabulous tonight (Wednesday). My only minor issue was that the cream cheese didn’t seem to get smooth after blending and so after the cake sat and we ate it, you could taste the crumbles of cream cheese. When I started to bend the mixture (using hand mixer) I started off slow, then sped up the speed thinking that would help remove the clumps. But then I saw your note about not over-mixing because that would cause air pockets. I continued to blend but at a lower speed then just put it in the pan to bake..thinking maybe the clumps would sort themselves out while baking. What do you recommend for next time? Either way, it was fabulous! Thank you!!!
The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.

We are on a low carb diet but my Husband loves Cheese Cake. Since it’s just the two of us I didn’t want to make such a large pie; so I cut the recipe in half (using 2 eggs) and used a 9″ Pyrex pie pan. I cooked it at 300 for 40 mins and it turned out perfect. We do live at almost 5K feet.) The only thing I would do different is add more powdered erythritol to the filling to suit our taste (everyone is different). Every night we have a slice and my Husband keeps telling me how good it is. Using the product labels of what I have on hand I came out with 6.25 net carbs per 1/8th of my pie pan. Thank you for helping us works some good sweets into our diet! The cheat days are going to be fewer and farther between now that I have found your site.
Love all your information. Thank you for taking the time to share all your useful information. I do have a question about my recent start on my keto program. According to what I believe I am doing. I feel as though I am doing everything right. I keep track of my macros which come in under my allotted measurements. I drink my keto coffee, have meats eggs and fish that are allowed, have made certain snacks and keto bombs to keep in the freezer for those sweet attacks. However, I keep testing urin on the test strips and it is yet to show where I am in ketosis. I have literally not had one unhealthy carb in 2 weeks. The scale does show a 7 lb drop. But let’s be truthful that is water weight. I most of all I’m looking for indicators that I am in ketosis. I should also mention that I have not had any symptoms of ketosis flu either. I have read all your suggestions along with scouring the internet with hours and hours and hours of time spent reading. I do take my MCT oil a tablespoon a day in my Bulletproof Coffee. I do have to have my heavy cream and Splenda in my coffee in order for me to drink it. That is the only thing that I can think of. But I can’t see where that would completely not allow my body to get into ketosis. You are opinion would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

If you’re on keto and have a sweet tooth, keep this sweetener out of reach. Artificial sweeteners have no place in a clean keto diet like Bulletproof, for several reasons. A recent study in rats[6] found that sucralose does not pass through the body undigested as previously thought. They also found that it showed up in rats’ fat deposits two weeks after the animals had stopped eating it, raising concerns about safety. Other research shows the low-carb sweetener wreaks havoc on your gut, worsening inflammation in people with conditions like Crohn’s disease.[7] Besides, if you’re using the non-pure version of sucralose (e.g. Splenda), it’s loaded with fillers that skyrocket its glycemic index up to about 80 — that’s higher than sugar.
Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
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