There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.
While I see your point with regards to animal suffering (which is an ongoing issue), this doesn't have to be the case and on the contrary, people are more and more interested in meat from ethical sources. Watching a TED talk may be an eye opener but we should all do some research on human evolution. Your comment is biased because it only looks at one side of the argument (not to mention that some points are totally wrong, such as comparing human digestion to elephants??)
Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.
Sea vegetables are another rich source of green-nutrition and are a very low carb vegetable. Seaweed is also a good source of iodine, essential for thyroid hormone production. Used in sheets it can make a great practical alternative to bread, rolled into a tube like sandwich. Algae is also a potent antioxidant protects us from various diseases. Sea vegetables are anti-cancer, anti-coagulant (reducing the risk of stroke) and antioxidant. You can eat plenty of seaweed on keto and it’s also high in sea salt.
Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.
There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
Hi Kathryn, Erythritol works differently than sorbitol. Erythritol gets absorbed in the small intestine but poorly metabolized. Sorbitol does not get absorbed and passes to the large intestine where it causes stomach discomfort and gastrointestinal issues. So, most people don’t have that issue with erythritol. Monk fruit would not increase net carbs so you could use either one, but the powdered version does have erythritol in it also.
I scanned all my ingredients and also clicked on your links. My almond flour matches with the same amount of carbs but when I input everything, it has my net carbs as 4. My app may round up for some (I use Carb Manager). I think for me, the full carbs from the cream cheese is 32 oz of cream cheese at 32 net carbs (my box of cream cheese shows >1 for 1 oz) Bobs Red Mill almond flour at 2 cups for 24 net carbs and my 3 eggs show 1 carb. All together it puts it at 3.56 carbs per slice based on just those carbs. So not too far off from the 3 carbs.
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