Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
While Yoplait is known for its dessert-flavored yogurts—a high-sugar snack that doesn’t make the cut while on keto—its newest addition tops our nutritional charts. Unlike other dairy yogurts, YQ by Yoplait drastically reduces its carb count by ultra-filtering the milk. This removes 99 percent of the lactose (a type of sugar), so you still get gut-loving probiotics with almost zero carbs.
Milk (only small amounts of raw, full-fat milk is allowed). Milk is not recommended for several reasons. Firstly, all the dairy products, milk is difficult to digest, as it lacks the "good" bacteria (eliminated through pasteurization) and may even contain hormones. Secondly, it is quite high in carbs (4-5 grams of carbs per 100 ml). For coffee and tea, replace milk with cream in reasonable amounts. You may have a small amount of raw milk but be aware of the extra carbs. Lastly, farmers in the United States use genetically engineered bovine growth hormone (rBGH). rBGH is injected to dairy cows to increase milk production. Opt for full-fat dairy labeled “NO rBGH”.
One of the most researched benefits, however, is how eating a high-fat diet can treat disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's. There are also potential benefits for some diabetics, as ketosis can help your body regulate its blood sugar. But an overabundance of ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, so those with type 1 diabetes may choose to pursue other dietary options.
Some people believe that it's dangerous when your body enters ketosis. However, it's important to understand the difference between ketosis, which is nutritionally safe, and ketoacidosis, which is caused by a lack of insulin and can increase blood sugar significantly. The ketogenic diet keeps the body in ketosis, not ketoacidosis. It's still important to monitor your ketone levels and consult with your doctor before embarking on this diet, since ketoacidosis is a serious medical issue.
Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.
Hi Jordan – thank you for reaching out. We have a ton of articles on here (https://theketoqueens.com/category/blog/) that you may find helpful. We also wrote a post about starting a keto diet (https://theketoqueens.com/keto-diet/), then we have a keto course that walks you step by step to starting a keto diet (under shop), and if you need individual keto coaching I do that on my other website LaraClevenger.com. Please let us know if you can help in any way.
Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Many people on the Keto diet avoid eating yogurt as it can be very high in carbohydrates, so using coconut cream can be the answer! You still get the thick and creamy consistency you are used to but without the extra carbs. The process takes a couple of days to allow for fermentation but after that, the yogurt will keep in the fridge for up to a week, so this recipe could become your weekend task!
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.

Processed meats, like hot dogs, deli meat and sausages, typically contain sulfites. “Sulfites are not healthy for anyone, they are carcinogenic and may be harmful to people with respiratory disorders,” Hunnes says. “Also, processed meats are carcinogenic (class I) according to the World Health Organization.” Beyond that, sulfites can cause certain vitamins — like folate, thiamine, and nicotinamide — in your food to break down more rapidly and you miss out on those nutrients.[8] Thiamine[9]and nicotinamide[10] have been shown to have powerful neuroprotective properties, and folic acid helps with DNA production. So, yeah, pretty important stuff.
Nuts are high in polyunsaturated fats (often abbreviated to PUFAs). For example, 100 grams of macadamia nuts have 206 mg omega-3 fatty acids and 1296 mg omega-6 fatty acids. Polyunsaturated fats can easily be damaged by heat and once those damaged fats are ingested by us, there’s a chance that it can cause oxidative damage (especially to DNA) in our bodies. 

Korma is a mild curry dish and is often what people try first when they are experimenting with Indian cookery. It has a creamy sauce which is made using all the usual Indian spices, but it does not have the heat of some curries. This great Keto recipe is also gluten-free but full of taste and would make a great family meal served over cauliflower rice.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.” 

First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Rich in gut-happy bacteria, yogurt is a great way to add a little sweetness to a Keto diet. Although you can find Greek or low carb coconut yogurts on many grocery store shelves, why not get creative and make your own? It’s easy as pie and delicious homemade yogurt will be a fabulous addition to the recipes featured on our list of top Keto-friendly yogurt dishes!
If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
We add collagen peptides to our coffee every morning because it’s beneficial for healthy joints, skin, hair, etc. If you use collagen peptides or want to add it to your diet after talking with your health care professional, we recommend Naked Nutrition Collagen Peptides Protein Powder. This product is grass-fed and pasture-raised, and is GMO free, dairy free, soy free, gluten free, and free of growth hormones.

Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.

Hi Sarah, Sorry, I don’t have that detail of granularity. The chart is designed to show equivalents if someone has a different type of sweetener, but is not meant to be a way to combine sweeteners. I suppose you could try doing a conversion for half the sweetener amount needed in the recipe, then use half of the original and half of the conversion. I just can’t say for sure if the results would be the same, and it would depend on the recipe. For cheesecake filling it would probably be fine as long as you use either a powdered sweetener (as in powdered erythritol or monk fruit) or super concentrated liquid or powder (as in pure stevia powder/liquid).
Hi Norma, The filling calls for confectioner’s (powdered) sweetener, and the crust can be either one, but I use regular (granulated) for the crust. If the filling is crunchy, what you have is granulated. Like you said, it still tastes good but the texture isn’t smooth if you don’t use confectioner’s. You can turn granulated into powdered by running it through a food processor for a while. Otherwise, you can buy the confectioner’s erythritol that I used here.
These pancakes do not turn out firm enough for you to be able to flip them in the air, but that is exactly what makes them so incredibly soft, fragile, meltable inside your mouth, etc. At this point, for some reason, I can’t help but hear Debra Morgan from the Dexter series using the f-word like a hundred times to compliment on the softness of the pancakes.

For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.
A handful of berries can be a delicious sweet treat and enjoyed as is to help keep carb consumption low. For an occasional indulgence, you can also top it with a dollop of full-fat whipped cream or unsweetened Greek yogurt. You can also combine about half a cup of fruit with non-starchy veggies, collagen and coconut milk and blend to make a keto fruit smoothie. Bump up the benefits even more by adding MCT oil, bone broth or a dash of healing herbs and spices to finish it off.
Most fruits are high in carbs and a natural source of sugar. This means that delicious, sweet fruits like mangoes, pomegranates, lychee, pears, kiwi, bananas and even apples may not make great choices if you're trying to stick with a ketogenic diet. Not being able to have apples on the keto diet may surprise you — after all, apples have such a good reputation for being healthy!
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
Before I let you enjoy this quick and simple (but not just “another-one-out-there”) recipe, I’d like to point out that using full-fat Greek yogurt is important. Xanthan gum, on the other hand, can be an optional ingredient, but I do recommend using it. That way you higher the chances for the fluffy pancakes to gain just the right amount of firmness.
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This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.
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