Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
The consensus is that the Carbs shown on nutritional labels for yogurt containers are extremely misleading. The fermentation process brought on by the active cultures in yogurt, consume roughly half of the stated carbs. The nutritional labeling system REQUIRES food manufacturers to build the label based on the pre-cooking (or fermenting in this case) stage of the food.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]

It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.


Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.
Maca is a kind of turnip from Peru. It is nicknamed “nature’s Viagra” for its libido boosting properties. Although it contains 60% NET carbs you only need a teaspoonful to give you a sweet tasting boost. A few grams of this superfood won’t take you out of ketosis. It’s adaptogenic, meaning it will boost your body, mind and mojo in multiple ways. Aloe Vera is a species of cactus related to the lily flower. It is antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal. It heals the gut and is used to successfully reduce the effects of radiation and stabilize cancerous tumors. It is a bit slimy to eat but can be added to salads and shakes and has zero carbs. This is a superhero in the plant kingdom and its zero carb status makes it perfect for keto.
Berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and taste delicious in a keto dessert. A handful of these fruits is ok from a carb perspective but just once a day. Blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, raspberries, strawberries and cranberries are keto friendly fruits. Topped with cream they make a lovely sweet and simple treat. Frozen with cream and blended up they make a natural and nutritious ice-cream! Another tasty and nutritious plant category are herbs and spices.

While I see your point with regards to animal suffering (which is an ongoing issue), this doesn't have to be the case and on the contrary, people are more and more interested in meat from ethical sources. Watching a TED talk may be an eye opener but we should all do some research on human evolution. Your comment is biased because it only looks at one side of the argument (not to mention that some points are totally wrong, such as comparing human digestion to elephants??)
You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.
The gist of the eating plan? Taking in so few carbs sends your body into ketosis—a state of burning fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates or sugars, explains Beth Warren, RDN, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Secrets of a Kosher Girl: A 21-Day Nourishing Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great (Even If You're Not Jewish). In order to stay in ketosis, you only consume 5% to 10% of your calories from carbohydrates—which for most followers is fewer than 20 grams total per day—and instead eat moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of fat.
However, grass-fed beef and bison are healthy. So, too, is virtually any animal that lives in its natural setting and feeds on its natural diet. When you eat a slice of grass-fed beef, you’re consuming the beneficial nutrients that the cow ate. This includes omega-3 fatty acids. And CLA, which is another healthy fatty acid. In fact, CLA may help reduce cancer.
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
I know I’m really late with this, but the rising in the oven/falling after being taken out of the oven is because the air in the batter is hot, resulting in an inflated-looking cheesecake. After it’s taken out of the oven, the cheesecake cools and the air in it is no longer hot so it can’t keep the cheesecake inflated. There’s not much you can do to avoid this, much like a souffle. The only thing I would think you can do to keep it from falling too much is to basically make a merengue with the egg whites instead of incorporating them at first (just put the egg yolks into the batter at the egg-adding stage) and then fold in the egg whites in thirds. This will change the texture of the cheesecake into something more fluffy like a Japanese-style cheesecake, though.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Most vegan protein sources (lentils, beans) are way too carb-heavy for keto, even if you don’t care that much about sticking to a strict Paleo diet. But if you eat eggs and dairy, it’s definitely possible to have a vegetarian keto diet that’s adequate in protein, reasonably varied and quite tasty. It would likely be lower in protein than a meat-heavy keto diet, but if that works well for you, then it’s totally fine!
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
I just took it out of the oven, & it smells WONDERFUL. I am having one issue though. After 45 min. in the oven, it was beautifully golden on the edges, perfectly smooth on top, & a bit jiggly in the middle. I gently sat it on the cool, glass stovetop. Within 3 min, it started developing deep cracks. i assumed it wasn’t done enough, so I put it in another 10 min. The same thing happened. I’ve double checked the recipe to assure I did it correctly. I did. Any suggestions?

NOTICE: The information contained or presented on this website is for educational purposes only. Information on this site is NOT intended to serve as a substitute for diagnosis, treatment, or advice from a qualified, licensed medical professional. The facts presented are offered as information only - not medical advice - and in no way should anyone infer that we or anyone appearing in any content on this website are practicing medicine. Any diet, health, or nutritional program you undertake should be discussed with your doctor or other licensed medical professional. Seek the advice of a medical professional for proper application of ANY material on this site to your specific situation.
Once you add in all the miscellaneous protein you get from nuts, dairy (if you eat dairy), eggs (around 18 grams per 3 eggs, so they’re comparable to meat), and other sources, it’s pretty easy to get plenty of protein with very reasonable amounts of meat. In fact, many people don’t eat more meat on keto than they ate before – they just get rid of all the junk that surrounded the meat.
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.
Nutrition – If you eat nuts and seeds daily, you minimize your risk of nutrient deficiencies. These foods are, as already explained, nutritional powerhouses. Fat makes up a big portion of the macros in nuts, with most having over 70% of fat per measure of weight. The quality of the fats in nuts is also worth noting as most a rich in monounsaturated fatty acids [2].
Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
Certain types of dairy can be enjoyed on the keto diet! Butter, cheese, full fat yogurts and heavy cream – this is not your typical diet fare! When eating dairy, you will generally want to choose ingredients that have a lower amount of lactose. Lactose is a sugar that will spike your blood sugar. You will want to stay away from milk, as it is full of lactose (aka sugar)! And of course, if you have lactose intolerance you should avoid dairy altogether.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
I have been on a Keto diet for a little over 2 weeks now. I am still getting tingly sensations and minor headaches, though I believe that will dissipate once I'm fully adjusted in another 2-4 weeks. I started running again and am pushing it pretty hard, so I'm sure that's contributing. It feels like when I used to starve myself for wrestling and I get a sense that my blood sugar is low. I have added hemp hearts (about 6 tablespoons per day) to help combat because I read more magnesium can help.
Keeping you trim. The fats found in cottage cheese will set your body to fat burning mode. A high fat diet will help put your body into ketosis meaning that your body will use fat for energy instead of glycogen and carbs (1). A ketogenic diet has been indicated to make a positive difference in weight loss and cardiovascular health among other diseases including epilepsy (3).
All grains, even whole meal (wheat, rye, oats, corn, barley, millet, bulgur, sorghum, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, sprouted grains), quinoa and white potatoes. this includes all products made from grains (pasta, bread, pizza, cookies, crackers, etc.) sugar and sweets (table sugar, HFCS, agave syrup, ice creams, cakes, sweet puddings and sugary soft-drinks).
Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
×