With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.

We love cheese’s creamy and smooth texture, but when you need a little crunch, it’s Whisps to the rescue! The crispy snack is made with 100 percent real cheese and is baked until it boasts a cracker-like texture and crunch. When you’re avoiding saltines, grab these low-carb thins and use them as a base for other fat-filled toppings such as jerky bits or avocado.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
Fruits with over 10g net carbs per 100g in weight. Depending on your carbohydrate tolerance and whether or not you are fat adapted, you may be stretching the boundaries of nutritional ketosis by eating fruit with higher carb content or more significant quantities of the low carb fruits listed. There will always be exceptions and outliers; be sure to reference the searchable low carb fruits list below to pinpoint carb counts if you are unsure.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
Fitness is my passion. Exercising and nutrition are my passion. I love sharing my knowledge with others... so that they can live happier, healthier, and more fulfilled lives. You can find me publishing on health and nutrition over at altprotein.com. If I am not exploring the peaks and valleys of NH I am off traveling abroad, learning new ideas and practicing new wellness techniques.
I make this crustless as I didn’t have the ingredients the first time I made it. Everyone loved it so much I always make it crustless. Lol. I also ran out of powdered swerve the last two times I made it, so my ratio is 1 cup powdered swerve and 1/4 cup granulated. It actually tastes better and has great texture. I served this to my husbands family and told them it was keto so if they didn’t like it they didn’t have to eat it. I had them all love it and go back for seconds! Been keto for 14 weeks and make this about every two weeks!
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
If you can’t find Carb Master milk at your local grocery store, you can easily substitute another dairy option. When selecting an alternative source for your keto yogurt, remember that keto dairy should be organic, grass fed and high-fat. Avoid 1% and 2% dairy products, which are typically loaded with carbohydrates. Instead, select raw milk, heavy cream or heavy whipping cream.

When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
This recipe uses kefir grains as the active ingredient to make the yogurt, and you can taste the mixture periodically to see how sour you like the yogurt. Once you have strained the mixture to remove the kefir grains, this yogurt can be stored in the refrigerator so you have a good supply for breakfast or as a snack for the kids after school. You can mix in some fruit or add in vanilla extract for extra flavor.
Thank you, Ashlee! To keep the texture the same, use lemon zest or lemon extract. Lemon juice isn’t potent enough and you’d need so much that the texture would change. I haven’t tested the amount of lemon zest or extract yet, but I’d try about a tablespoon of zest or 1 1/2 tsp of extract. You can add it before adding the eggs and taste (since there are no raw ingredients before adding eggs). Just keep in mind that at that stage you’ll want it more potent than the end result, since the eggs will dilute it a little. Let me know how it goes!
Because you are using active ingredients in this recipe, it is important that you clean the equipment well before you start, but this can be done easily by soaking them in boiling water. This low-carb recipe uses live yogurt to start the culture process, and any plain one will do. Once the yogurt is ready you can serve it with berries or use it to make delicious creamy sauces.
The question of what kinds of fat one should eat is still pretty much unresolved. What we know today for sure is this: It doesn’t really matter how much fat you eat, so long as you don’t eat too many calories. (Fats contain 9 calories per gram, compared to carbs and protein, which each have 4.) We also know that trans fats are bad, and we kinda-sorta think that unsaturated fats might be better than saturated fats. Beyond this, we can’t say too much for sure. In terms of food trends, it doesn’t really matter because fads are rarely backed by concrete fact.

Maybe you remember that some years back, cottage cheese was a staple in everyone’s low-fat diet. If you could get past the texture, you probably purchased a 6 pack and forced yourself to swallow it down mid-day because you thought it was the secret to making those love handles disappear. I’m not saying you were wrong—but you weren’t completely right.

Some people on keto think they can skip eating their greens and just focus on the keto macros. But, they miss out on the healing potential of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit add to the keto diet. It’s not just exotic species and tropical spices that are getting recognition, common low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruits are densely packed with super-nutrition. This new class of healing plants are becoming known as ‘functional foods’. They have an important role to play in a healthy keto diet.
Thus, while nuts and seeds are great to include on a ketogenic diet, it probably would be wise to limit your portions to a serving or two (1–2 oz.) per day. An ounce of nuts is about the size of a small handful. If you want to be even more precise, a serving size is close to: 24 almonds, 18 medium cashews, 12 hazelnuts or filberts, 8 medium Brazil nuts, 12 macadamia nuts, 35 peanuts, 15 pecan halves or 14 English walnut halves.
Here’s a nutritional list of some of the more commonly consumed vegetables on keto. Keep in mind that the weights are the same of everything listed so that it will impact the skew of the carb counts. For example, in a meal you may have 6 oz. of broccoli in the side, but you would not have 6 oz. worth of berries in the morning. You may mix 6 oz. of berries into a pudding with 4 servings.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
×