Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.
However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.
A handful of berries can be a delicious sweet treat and enjoyed as is to help keep carb consumption low. For an occasional indulgence, you can also top it with a dollop of full-fat whipped cream or unsweetened Greek yogurt. You can also combine about half a cup of fruit with non-starchy veggies, collagen and coconut milk and blend to make a keto fruit smoothie. Bump up the benefits even more by adding MCT oil, bone broth or a dash of healing herbs and spices to finish it off.

Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
This recipe is just amazing!!! Thank you for sharing! Quick question for you: I came up with 6 net carbs a serving (using Wellbee’s flour and taking all swerve carbs out if the equation). I see your nutrition facts list 3 but then a comment you wrote said 5. Any idea which it actually is for you and any guesses what the discrepancies could be?? Thanks again!
Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance.  Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis.  One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods.  So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy.  Here are 22 ketogenic foods that you will LOVE!
Maca is a kind of turnip from Peru. It is nicknamed “nature’s Viagra” for its libido boosting properties. Although it contains 60% NET carbs you only need a teaspoonful to give you a sweet tasting boost. A few grams of this superfood won’t take you out of ketosis. It’s adaptogenic, meaning it will boost your body, mind and mojo in multiple ways. Aloe Vera is a species of cactus related to the lily flower. It is antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal. It heals the gut and is used to successfully reduce the effects of radiation and stabilize cancerous tumors. It is a bit slimy to eat but can be added to salads and shakes and has zero carbs. This is a superhero in the plant kingdom and its zero carb status makes it perfect for keto.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.

Hi Sean, peanuts are legumes. Firstly, although they are relatively low in carbs, peanuts contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. Also, legumes in general have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. Having said that, many people eat peanuts when following a keto diet and experience none of these issues. You have to try what works best for you.
I totally understand how you feel! 😊 But the truth is that most people can't do that... speaking from my own experience. When I started following a low-carb diet my palate was completely different to what it is now and I couldn't imagine skipping sweeteners, bread alternatives and other substitutes. They helped me transition into the way I eat now. These days I don't use any sweeteners - or just a small amount in occasional treats. I keep my diet very simple and often cook with just 5-10 ingredients.
Even though star fruit is another fruit that some people don’t think to add to their grocery list, it’s worth a try if you’re on keto and want to satisfy your sweet tooth. A ½-cup serving of cubed star fruit contains about 2.6 g of net carbohydrates, plus 1.8 g of fiber and 2.6 g of sugar. It’s also low in calories and has 88 mg of potassium (1.9 percent DV) and 22.7 mg of vitamin C (38 percent DV). 
Keeping you focused on the other hand, has a little more to do with cottage cheeses’ fats. Eating good fats in the morning is crucial for lasting brain power. Before we go into the benefits of healthy fats let’s demystify the low-fat diet. Remember when fat and dairy consumption was obesity’s best friend and the cause of your loved one’s heart attacks?
Easily incorporate coconut flakes into your diet by adding them to trail mix, ketogenic desserts, smoothies, or using as an alternative to bread crumbs in coating poultry. Try this brand of coconut flakes by Lets Do Organics for coconut flakes with no added sweeteners or preservatives.  Nutiva makes a great coconut butter that they call coconut manna here
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!)
I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
I bought some pumpkin seeds with shells and was looking at them thinking that I hadn't thought out whether these were a good idea to eat.  So I headed for the internet with a little apprehension.  Thanks for the well-written, scientifically supported article.  So much of what I read about keto/low carb diets is full of non-scientific gobbledygook.  On the other hand, I'm going to bookmark this one for future reference.  

Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!


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Today is the 3-year anniversary of Wholesome Yum! I am so humbled and grateful every single day that I get to do this. Thank you for being here… from the bottom of my heart! So to honor the anniversary of my little low carb recipe site (that maybe isn’t so little anymore?), I wanted to share with you one of my favorite low carb recipes. It’s not a celebratory cake or low carb dessert, but it’s a part of a popular low carb dinner staple… low carb tacos using keto cheese taco shells!

This post may contain affiliate links to products we believe in, which means that even though it doesn’t cost you anything extra, The Keto Queens will receive a small amount of money from the sale of these items. Also, please know that nutritional information is provided as a courtesy calculated from the nutrition plugin API and we cannot guarantee its accuracy.
Some people on keto think they can skip eating their greens and just focus on the keto macros. But, they miss out on the healing potential of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit add to the keto diet. It’s not just exotic species and tropical spices that are getting recognition, common low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruits are densely packed with super-nutrition. This new class of healing plants are becoming known as ‘functional foods’. They have an important role to play in a healthy keto diet.
Although rhubarb is a vegetable, it is culinary fruit. The plant's leaf stalks are the only edible part noted for their tart and slightly sweet taste. Rhubarb complements strawberries well in desserts but there are many other ways to use this low-carb keto diet fruit. Studies show that rhubarb has powerful healing properties with evidence that it can even fight sepsis [6].
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
If you're still not sure what to do, or you're a keto veteran and you're looking for some help, you should check out our coaching program. Ketovangelist coaches live keto all day, every day. We keep up to date on the latest science, too. But more importantly, we focus on your goals to help you achieve success in your keto journey. It's always better to have someone in your corner, guiding you along. So if you're ready for success, sign up for a coach today.
Keep in mind, however, that nuts are very calorically dense and easy to overeat. They are crunchy, tasty, and often have added salt, which makes them even more delicious. The most keto-friendly nuts are the highest in fat and also the highest in calories such as pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, etc… and because of that, they’re also the most satisfying.
The nominal amount of carbs allowed on keto makes it challenging to find snacks that won't screw up your diet. But nuts should be a go-to for any keto enthusiast, as they're high in fat without being loaded with too many carbs. If you're looking for the lowest carb nuts, add these to your emergency snack stash so you're prepared when hunger strikes.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”

Prior to your response, I did make a cheesecake, using your recipe for the filling (so delish, and I received all favorable comments on it). Due to the cost difference between almond and coconut flour, I did find a recipe similar to the one you shared in your response, 1/2 C melted butter (1 stick) whisked until fully blended with 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp vanilla. Then slowly mix in 3/4 C sifted coconut flour. Kneaded for about a minute, adding coconut flour until not sticky. I simply then pressed crust into only the bottom portion of the springform pan, used a fork to punch multiple holes in it, then baked at 400° for 10 minutes. I let it fully cool before adding filling, then used your perfect instructions to bake the cheesecake. Love, love, love this recipe. I’m a happy Type-II Diabetic!


Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).

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