Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.
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Getting the adequate amount of fat required to send your body into ketosis is fairly easy. Common sources of keto-approved fat include salmon, avocados, and coconut oil. For example, you could throw a couple of tablespoons of coconut oil into your favorite smoothie. Or you could pull a keto classic and mix in a tablespoon of butter or coconut oil into your coffee. When going keto, make sure to drink lots of water, resist processed foods, track what you eat, and monitor your blood sugar levels.
Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you.
Are you missing your lattes and frappes? Time for a quick keto coffee fix! Ketoproof coffee is a fantastic mix of coconut oil and butter in your coffee instead of the generic cream or milk. You might think that it sounds disgusting at first, but if you think about what butter is made out of – it’s pretty much just hardened cream. Once you melt it down and mix it all up using an immersion blender, you get a delicious latte-like froth on the top of your morning coffee.

The problem with some meats when you’re on Keto is that they are too lean. That means, even though it’s low in carbs, some meat has too much protein and not enough fat. That doesn’t mean you can’t have those meats. It just means you’ll need to be careful not to go over your protein macro. And if there isn’t enough fat in the meat you eat, then you will want to pick up some extra, healthy fat somewhere else.

You may need to trial a few kinds of cheese to find the best one that will bake to a crispy shell, and each one will vary considerably. I used a regular block of cheese, shredded/grated it, then cooked until I knew it would be crispy when cooled down. The first ones I tried when I was developing this, I discovered I hadn’t cooked them long enough to crisp up.

If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
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