I use Swerve powder and Pyure Blend. When you say you can use any sweetener you want, are the measurements 1:1 with your listed sweeteners. I’ve checked the Sweetener conversion chart you’ve provided and if you call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol, there is no conversion for Pyure, and a lot of your recipies call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol. I just want to make sure I do accurate measurements.

This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
Even though star fruit is another fruit that some people don’t think to add to their grocery list, it’s worth a try if you’re on keto and want to satisfy your sweet tooth. A ½-cup serving of cubed star fruit contains about 2.6 g of net carbohydrates, plus 1.8 g of fiber and 2.6 g of sugar. It’s also low in calories and has 88 mg of potassium (1.9 percent DV) and 22.7 mg of vitamin C (38 percent DV). 
Hi Sarah, Sorry, I don’t have that detail of granularity. The chart is designed to show equivalents if someone has a different type of sweetener, but is not meant to be a way to combine sweeteners. I suppose you could try doing a conversion for half the sweetener amount needed in the recipe, then use half of the original and half of the conversion. I just can’t say for sure if the results would be the same, and it would depend on the recipe. For cheesecake filling it would probably be fine as long as you use either a powdered sweetener (as in powdered erythritol or monk fruit) or super concentrated liquid or powder (as in pure stevia powder/liquid).

If you can’t find Carb Master milk at your local grocery store, you can easily substitute another dairy option. When selecting an alternative source for your keto yogurt, remember that keto dairy should be organic, grass fed and high-fat. Avoid 1% and 2% dairy products, which are typically loaded with carbohydrates. Instead, select raw milk, heavy cream or heavy whipping cream.
Individuals with type-2 diabetes have especially found to have major health benefits from the consumption of this compound in foods like shirataki noodles. Although glucose levels elevated following a meal with glucomannan, studies show that insulin levels in type-2 diabetics is not significantly impacted. (36, 37)  I use these shiratki noodles on a regular basis.  This is one of the best foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. 

These keto nuts are one of the best sources of vitamin E, niacin, folate, magnesium, and choline. All of these nutrients are lacking in our diets, especially choline, a vitamin-like essential nutrient. You need choline to keep your liver and brain healthy [8]. Choline is also the precursor to acetylcholine [9] – a neurotransmitter important for muscle functioning among other things.
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
Not only is this a low-carb recipe, but coconut yogurt is also vegan-friendly and can be so useful for a quick dish at breakfast time. Simply mix the two ingredients, cover the bowl and wait! It could not be easier! This yogurt can be mixed with fruit puree, topped with nuts if you can tolerate them, or flavored with vanilla. It can also be stirred into a spicy dish to reduce the heat.
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