Dehydrated fruit. When fruit is dehydrated, the moisture is removed. This process makes dehydrated fruit more nutrient dense than its fresh counterpart and ensures higher carb and sugar count by weight. Take apricots for example. In 100 grams of raw apricot, there are 9 grams of net carbohydrates. But in 100 grams of dehydrated apricot, the net carb count skyrockets to 82 grams of net carbs. Pretty significant difference, and you’ll see the same thing with plums vs. prunes, raisins, cran-raisins, and all the other dried variety of fruits.  
This cheesecake tastes amazing! I made it for the first time yesterday, and the hardest part was waiting for it to cool. I did modify the recipe slightly; I only used 20 ounces (2 1/2 packs) of cream cheese just because I was mixing them one block at a time and it seemed to be plenty enough for the entire cheesecake at 2 1/2. I then used half of the batter to make the cheesecake in a pie plate and used the other half to make 24 mini crustless cheesecakes. I still used the same amount of sweetener for the filling because I like my cheesecake on the sweeter side. I loved the crust as well. I made a strawberry topping and it tasted very similar to a cheesecake biscuit with jelly. The next time I can get my hands on dairy-free cream cheese, I will make it with that. I will definitely be making this for my next family gathering. Thanks so much for the delicious recipe!
Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.

Keep in mind that, although there are plenty of keto-friendly fruit options out there, consumption of fruit on the keto diet should still be limited. Even on a modified keto diet, it’s recommended to aim for around 30–50 grams of net carbs per day to maintain ketosis and maximize results. Even one or two servings of these low-carb fruits can knock out a good chunk of your daily carb allotment in one shot, effectively kicking you out ketosis.
I just took it out of the oven, & it smells WONDERFUL. I am having one issue though. After 45 min. in the oven, it was beautifully golden on the edges, perfectly smooth on top, & a bit jiggly in the middle. I gently sat it on the cool, glass stovetop. Within 3 min, it started developing deep cracks. i assumed it wasn’t done enough, so I put it in another 10 min. The same thing happened. I’ve double checked the recipe to assure I did it correctly. I did. Any suggestions?
The top three “fruits” on this list hardly exemplify the prototypical image of fruits in our minds, and it should come as no surprise. Fruits are typically banished from everyone’s keto diet shopping list, and for good reason. They simply pack too much sugar, and sugar is what we’re supposed to be avoiding at all costs, right? While this assertion may be true for most fruits, it turns out that there are a few delicious berries that provide very manageable carb content at a reasonable serving size. Two ounces of raspberries every day would certainly be enough for most people. You can always grab another 2oz for a total of 14 grams of net carbs. This will require some macro gymnastics if you’re hoping to enjoy balanced meals for the rest of the day, however.

If you’re new or just still learning the ropes for the keto diet food list, your biggest questions probably revolve around figuring out just what high-fat low-carb foods you can eat on such a low-carb, ketogenic diet. Overall, remember that the bulk of calories on the keto diet are from foods that are high in natural fats along with a moderate amount of foods with protein. Those that are severely restricted are all foods that provide lots of carbs, even kinds that are normally thought of as “healthy,” like whole grains, for example.


Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.

This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
Keep in mind, however, that nuts are very calorically dense and easy to overeat. They are crunchy, tasty, and often have added salt, which makes them even more delicious. The most keto-friendly nuts are the highest in fat and also the highest in calories such as pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, etc… and because of that, they’re also the most satisfying.
With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.
Whether you munch on them on their own or pair them with melt-in-your-mouth Havarti, Kalamata olives are one of our go-to snacks both on and off keto. Six plump olives boast just 35 calories and 130 milligrams of sodium, a low count to keep bloating at bay. Most of the fat content in olives is monounsaturated, and more specifically oleic acid, which has been linked to anti-inflammatory and heart-protective benefits.

They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.
Many people on the Keto diet avoid eating yogurt as it can be very high in carbohydrates, so using coconut cream can be the answer! You still get the thick and creamy consistency you are used to but without the extra carbs. The process takes a couple of days to allow for fermentation but after that, the yogurt will keep in the fridge for up to a week, so this recipe could become your weekend task!

Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2. 

One of the fattiest nuts out there; because of their high content of monounsaturated fats, macadamia nuts are beneficial for cardiovascular health. As other nuts, they contain a lot of micronutrients, such as magnesium, calcium, copper, vitamin B6. Because of their high caloric content, you need to be particularly careful with properly measuring portion sizes.
Being rich in healthy oils makes these nuts particularly good for cardiovascular health [12]. Studies on macadamia oil show that it reduces inflammation and shrinks the size of fat cells [13]. This is helpful for people with obesity as inflammation and enlarged fat cells both make the disorder difficult to manage. Besides a perfect macros profile, macadamia nuts are also a good source of B vitamins, iron, manganese, and zinc.

Because some fruits have more carbs than others, knowing which to avoid is key for accelerating weight loss and reaping other possible benefits of keto. Just know that large, long-term, randomized controlled trials on the keto diet are limited, so it’s unclear whether keto is safe and effective to follow for the long haul, according to Harvard Medical School.
In prospective cohort studies, increased nut intake has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease,[8] type 2 diabetes mellitus,[9][10] metabolic syndrome,[11] colon cancer,[12] hypertension,[13] gallstone disease,[14] diverticulitis,[15] and death from inflammatory diseases.[16] Overall, nuts and seeds are great foods to promote overall health and well-being in both the short and long-term!
In prospective cohort studies, increased nut intake has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease,[8] type 2 diabetes mellitus,[9][10] metabolic syndrome,[11] colon cancer,[12] hypertension,[13] gallstone disease,[14] diverticulitis,[15] and death from inflammatory diseases.[16] Overall, nuts and seeds are great foods to promote overall health and well-being in both the short and long-term!
As mentioned earlier, the keto diet takes carbs intake into consideration. And if you look at carbs found in yogurt, you will find that yogurt, of many types, have lots of carbs. Strawberry yogurt, for instance, has around 33 grams of carbs, which is more than recommended 20g of carbs per meal to be in shape – and less than 20g per meal to lose weight.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
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