We love cheese’s creamy and smooth texture, but when you need a little crunch, it’s Whisps to the rescue! The crispy snack is made with 100 percent real cheese and is baked until it boasts a cracker-like texture and crunch. When you’re avoiding saltines, grab these low-carb thins and use them as a base for other fat-filled toppings such as jerky bits or avocado.
Maya! I have made this about 6 times and my family and friends flip over it. I hand wrote on the printed recipe: “Freakin-Awesome!!!” My 17 year old son saw my note and chuckled. We pour pure blueberry, cherry or pomegranate juice that’s cold pressed on top when we have company. Thank you for a really great recipe. We’re on the plant paradox diet and this is very good to have. 🙂
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
If you have a cow’s milk intolerance, you might find goat’s milk can be a good replacement as it is much easier to digest and won’t upset your system. This is a great recipe if you fancy trying goat’s milk yogurt and it can be used in all the ways you would use other yogurts. You will find that this one is rather thin, so if you like your yogurt thicker, strain the mixture through a cloth and the result will be much better.
Other herbs like dried rosemary, sweet basil and oregano contain polyphenols that enhance organic acid synthesis by improving the gut flora (4). Organic acids are key to maintain bowel health and aid in nutrient absorption. These herbs destroy harmful bacteria and provide antioxidant, anti-viral and anti-fungal benefits to help you maintain a strong immune system (5).
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.

FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets! And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar!
Nutrients often work synergistically in nature. For this reason, when the monounsaturated fats in avocados are paired with foods containing lycopene and beta-carotene they can actually increase the absorption of these antioxidants into the body. Monounsaturated fats also significantly decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels (23).  Avocados are one of the amazing ketogenic foods I eat every day!
Time to address the elephant in the room. Rhubarb is not a fruit. Or at least, rhubarb fails the eye test at first glance. It looks like red celery. When raw, it feels like celery. Hard, bitter, fibrous, and about as enjoyable as a spoonful of cough syrup. Except, that’s not rhubarb at all. Rhubarb measures like a vegetable but tastes like a fruit. It cooks like a fruit and fits the sweet profile you may be craving on a Tuesday night. Reduce 4 ounces of chopped rhubarb with 4 ounces of strawberries, and you have sweet fruit topping that barely skims 9 grams of net carbs, or roughly 4.5 net carbs per serving.
This looks awesome and I’m going to try it. I’ve been doing “keto” since before it was called that. I fell off the wagon several years ago but have recently come back to the fold as it’s the only way of eating that works for me. Anyway I wanted to mention that when my kids were growing up I made yogurt often. And then when I started low carbing I decided to try making it with heavy cream and it worked! And it’s amazing. Obviously more work than this but try it!
The net carb content of the acids near the top of this list actually accounts for more than a few generous squeezes. In other words, a wedge of lime is not going to be your downfall. And yes, the blueberry barely placed. What a disappointing showing for the fruit of intellectuals. With roughly 7 grams of sugar per 2 ounces, the kick is hardly noticeable. One could never guess based on the subtle bite each dainty berry provided for our tastebuds, as they were just that. Subtle. Too subtle for the price of admission. The rest of the berry gang just may be better off without it, but then again, stock photographers play by different rules.
We add collagen peptides to our coffee every morning because it’s beneficial for healthy joints, skin, hair, etc. If you use collagen peptides or want to add it to your diet after talking with your health care professional, we recommend Naked Nutrition Collagen Peptides Protein Powder. This product is grass-fed and pasture-raised, and is GMO free, dairy free, soy free, gluten free, and free of growth hormones. 

The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
The keto diet has become one of the most popular recent health trends. Short for “ketogenic diet,” the keto diet is all about minimizing your carbs and upping your fats. After a few days of following this eating routine, you go into something called ketosis, or the state your body enters when it doesn’t have enough carbs for your cells to use for energy. At this point, your body starts burning fat for more energy.

Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Keep an eye on your intake for nut or seed based foods, as they can be quite high in inflammatory omega 6’s. These include items like almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, sunflower oil and corn oil. Eating fatty fish and animal meat, keeping snacking to a minimum, and not over-indulging in dessert items that are dense in almond flour is usually enough to keep your omega’s at normal ranges.
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.

To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.


Unfortunately, all of these fruits are high in carbs and sugar. To put this into context, if you were to eat a whole mango, you'd be consuming more than 30 grams of sugar and 50 grams of carbs. Bananas are also high sugar and carbs — very unfortunate since they're so useful for smoothies. If you're looking for that creamy texture, you can always replace them with the keto-friendly avocado as an alternative.
To make fruit a part of your keto diet, it's best to add it to your meals instead of eating it on its own. For example, you can make a small fruit salad topped with heavy cream (sweetened with stevia, of course). You can also add a bit of keto diet fruit to your smoothie, chia pudding, keto muffins or top cheesecakes or pancakes with a couple of berries.

Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”

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