Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.

Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.


Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.

If you didn’t already hear all the buzz surrounding going keto, now’s the time to get familiarized with the trend. The ketogenic diet, or keto for short, is centered around eating high fat, moderate protein, and super-low-carb foods so that your body begins burning through your fat stores rather than glucose for energy. Essentially, you eat loads of fat from foods such as cheese, bacon, and coconut oil—and get lean! (Psst: it’s also how Kourtney Kardashian and Halle Berry keep trim and toned.)
Not in the mood for cake? Brownies definitely come second on that list of delicious treats that we want once we turn to a ketogenic diet. You can easily make keto brownies that you can fully enjoy without having to fight against the craving to have more. Besides using almond flour and other mixtures of flours, you can make them out of avocado as well.
Keto is a lot more than a big pile of bacon – you don’t even need to eat meat at every meal to get enough protein for keto. Eggs are a great staple protein source, and low-carb dairy foods like cheese can give you a boost in the protein department. Getting high-quality protein at every meal is a good practice in general, especially for weight loss, but it doesn’t take any more meat than most people normally eat at a serving.
Does the Ketogenic diet work for type 2 diabetes? What is the ketogenic diet and can it help people with type 2 diabetes? Research has shown that people who follow a ketogenic diet can improve the management of their blood sugar levels. Learn here about how the ketogenic diet works, what you can eat, potential side effects, criticisms of the diet, plus alternatives? Read now 

Yogurt topped with a few nuts might seem like a no-brainer keto snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you opt for flavored yogurt, like vanilla, that carb count doubles to 24 grams of carbohydrates for 6 ounces. Your best bet is to choose plain Greek yogurt, which has as little as five grams of carbohydrates for a 7 ounce serving.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
Hi do you boil the heavy whipping cream 1st? I make SCD yogurt. specific carbohydrate diet.. and I add my own cultures which requires you to 1st boil the milk To kill off any bad bacterias then let it cool and add powdered enzymes then let it ferment for 24 hours so the enzymes can eat all the lactose making it lactose free. I was thinking of using whipping cream instead of milk but wasn’t sure about the boiling process?
My husband and I have been eating low-carb for about 5 years now, so you can imagine how many meals I’ve cooked for this way of eating. We just ate double servings of this cheesecake, topped with a mixed berry sauce, and we both agreed that without doubt this is the finest cheesecake recipe we’ve ever tasted. Ever. My husband’s birthday is next month. In the middle of eating this, he told me this is what he wants for his birthday “cake.” Then he told me to rename it “AAAACheescake” so that it will be the first one in my recipe file. I’m going away for the weekend, so I have to freeze the rest of it or there won’t be any left when I get back! Thank you so much for the time and effort you put into this! I’ll be telling everyone about your website. May God continue to bless you as you help us all live a healthy life!
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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