First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
One of the best things about being on the keto diet is the emphasis on consuming good fats. In my case, that means indulging in nuts whenever I need a quick pick-me-up. However, it's important to note that not all nuts are created equal when you're on the keto diet. Since the emphasis with keto focuses on low carbs and high fats, you have to keep an eye on serving sizes as well as knowing which nuts bring the most bang for your buck as far as fats are concerned. (Say goodbye to peanuts.)
If you choose low fat or fat free dairy items entirely, be sure to thoroughly inspect the ingredients list on the label. These products often have tons of added sugar or other starchy fillers to make them more palatable. When you remove fat, you destroy the natural flavor and completely change the consistency. Food companies use sugar to make up for it. Fat is not inherently bad. Don’t shy away, embrace it on the keto diet!
We add collagen peptides to our coffee every morning because it’s beneficial for healthy joints, skin, hair, etc. If you use collagen peptides or want to add it to your diet after talking with your health care professional, we recommend Naked Nutrition Collagen Peptides Protein Powder. This product is grass-fed and pasture-raised, and is GMO free, dairy free, soy free, gluten free, and free of growth hormones.

With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.

Not sure what foods you should eat on the keto diet? This keto food list will get you started. By depriving your body of glucose, the high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet shifts your body into ketosis, a state of burning fat instead of sugar for energy. Take the guesswork out of eating keto, and follow this complete keto diet food list to start dropping weight and feel amazing.
If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.” 

When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
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