You can usually use a mix of multiple flours to get a realistic texture in baking recipes. Combining flours and experimenting with your baking can lead to much lower net carb counts in recipes. We think these lemon poppyseed muffins (a mix of almond flour and flaxseed meal) make a great texture when combined with the fats from the heavy cream and butter.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
Michelle, I second Libby’s remarks about “The fear of saturated fat is so old fashioned and outdated. Research shows saturated fat is healthy, stable and protective.”. In addition to her link, get a used copy (or new) of Nora Gedgaudas’s book Primal Body Primal Mind. Dr. Eric Berg has put out many youtube videos about Keto and intermittent fasting. Search his name with weight, or keto, or intermittent fasting, or phytic acid. They are some interesting videos.
Thank you for posting usable lists but how does one know what the limits are for the dietary requirements? Back in the day, you would have a number set for calorie, carbs, fat grams, etc limits that you would strive to follow each day. I see all kind of recipes that lists content for following the Keto method but I don’t know how to apply the information in a usable way. Am I missing something?
Many people choose ketoproof coffee or tea in the morning to ramp up energy with added fats. While it is a great thing, it’s also important to consume flavored beverages in moderation. This is amplified when it comes to caffeine as too much will lead to weight loss stalls; try to limit yourself to a maximum of 2 cups of caffeinated beverages a day.
Hi Justin, I’m glad you liked the cheesecake! This definitely doesn’t have 18g net carbs per slice – you can see that even at a glance since all the ingredients are very low carb (almond flour, cream cheese, eggs, erythritol, etc.) The nutrition label included below the recipe card shows the nutrition breakdown per slice. In MyFitnessPal, did you set the number of servings for the recipe to 16? If it was set to something else, that could be one reason for the number to be significantly off like that.
To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.

Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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