When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.
Never before has so much attention been given to the healing and beneficial effects of plants. Study after study is confirming that plants have medicinal power. Some, like turmeric, rival modern pharmaceuticals in their ability to fight infection and even treat cancer. With the added bonus of working holistically with your body without side-effects. Plants reduce inflammation, support detoxification and generally improve your health! 

I use Swerve powder and Pyure Blend. When you say you can use any sweetener you want, are the measurements 1:1 with your listed sweeteners. I’ve checked the Sweetener conversion chart you’ve provided and if you call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol, there is no conversion for Pyure, and a lot of your recipies call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol. I just want to make sure I do accurate measurements.
Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
Hi Maya! I only have 2 options for sweetener on hand: Sweet-Leaf powdered Stevia, or Truvia Baking Blend. Which do you think would turn out best? The Truvia is granulated, but its made from Erythritol and seems like I can use larger quantities of it. The Sweet-leaf container says I should use MUCH less, but it’s powdered. This is my first time baking using sugar alternatives and I’m just not sure which would be better!
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.
Hey, can I add more vanilla and lemon without it changing the consistancy of the cheescake. Also is the fruit sauce still keto approved since it has natural sugar. If so, can I use blueberries or strawberries instead? Sorry, I’ve tried to ask a few times now so if a million different versions of this question shows up, I apologize. BTW loved this recipe. I just wanted it to taste a little bolder on its own.
Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!

With the help of keto-friendly ingredients, you can easily make yourself some delicious, fluffy pancakes. There are, in fact, several ways to make fantastic keto pancakes, but our favorite is the Faux “Buckwheat” Pancakes made with almond flour and flaxseed meal. Try them for yourself if you want low-carb pancakes that taste just like the real thing.

This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.
I was about 2-3 oz shy of the cream cheese called for in the recipe (I’d forgotten that I had already used some for another recipe earlier) but decided I’d chance it and proceeded with the cheesecake anyway. Id originally intended to follow this recipe as written but that lasted all of 5 minutes– I can’t resist a tweak here or there. I wanted a little bit more lemon flavor in the filling to go with my blueberry topping, so I added some zest to the batter and then added a healthy sprinkling of cinnamon to the crust mixture. I highly recommend the addition of cinnamon for that Graham cracker crust flavor.
Me and my husband are on the keto diet and I figured that its that time we have some keto treat. This cheesecake is suprisingly delicious considering there is no real sugar but it does leave your tongue burning for some time not sure why is that. Also this morning we both gained nearly 1 lbs:( I guess we went over our carb count. I had 1 slice he had 2. That same day we had burgers and some salad so I guess we didn’t stay under 20 grams of carbs. I will freeze this cheesecake for later. Just wondering how long does it last in fridge and freezer?
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
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