How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.

Meat supplies a whole range of nutrients – including nutrients like vitamin B12 that you can’t get anywhere else. It’s also a key source of protein for keto diets. At the very minimum, humans need to eat enough protein to repair our muscles and do all the other important stuff that protein does. So “enough meat” means enough to serve as a primary protein source and round out your diet with essential nutrients that are mainly or only found in meat.


Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.
You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.
Low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruits are packed with super-nutrition, but you can get an even bigger dose of health from some specialist plants known to boost your body. Called superfoods these plants have super-special gifts for mankind. While there is no strict definition but superfood, they are often exceptionally high in nutrition, with specific and potent medicinal qualities, aid weight loss and hormonal balance, reduce oxidation and are naturally anti-aging. They are often from harsh environments where they need to produce specific compounds in self defense. 

Thank you for your hard work on this article. I am allergic to tree nuts and on a Keto diet. I probably eat way too much peanut butter which I heard is a no no-no Keto, but eat it anyway, so probably sabotaging my weightloss.  Yes, I know peanuts are a legume and not a nut. My latest snack is peanut butter (1 cup), 1/4 cup coconut oil, 3 "baby scoops" stevia(Kal brand) , pinch salt and 3 tablespoons of ground hemp seed (because they have a pretty neutral flavor in the recipe and I believe one of the most nutritious foods on earth.) Melt all together in small saucepan and scoop into peanut butter cup shaped silicone molds or parchment lined loaf pan.
These were super yummy!!! I used Mexican Style Shredded Cheese by Kroger which has less than 1 gram of carbs and 100 calories per ounce. My daughter and I each had 1 taco. She loved it! We both loved how much more flavor there was than regular tacos shells. I’m thinking about using this as a crust for pizza, too! Cheese crust! Yum! Thank you for this recipe!!!
As for all the other nutrients in meat? If you’re eating enough meat to get your protein, you’ll probably get enough of those, too. For example, that 4 ounces of chuck roast contains 113% of the RDA for vitamin B12, plus substantial amounts of other B vitamins, like choline. For people without special nutritional needs, it’s just not necessary to worry about it beyond that.

Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
Yes, they're technically a fruit, but we think olives deserve a shout-out all of their own, since they're also a great source of healthy fats and are one of a few keto-approved packaged foods. Plus, they're a great source of antioxidants, will satisfy your craving for something salty, and are blissfully low-carb. “About a palm's worth only has 3 grams of net carbs,” Sarah Jadin, RD, told Health in a previous interview.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.

So, how do we ensure enough super-plant based nutrition on keto? Fortunately there are loads of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit you can choose from! Let’s start with low carb vegetables - specifically the green ones! The green color in plants is called chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight and turn it into energy. Chlorophyll protects the body from cancer and cleanses the liver. Amazingly, our bodies can also use chlorophyll inside our mitochondria. This is why green juices, made fresh or from powders, give us a rapid natural energy boost. Green leafy plants like Kale, Spinach and Collard Greens reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases. Make sure you eat your greens on keto!
Over the past several decades, research on low-fat diets has evolved. Since releasing its infamous review, Time has released follow-up articles that suggest cholesterol and fat may not be as bad as originally thought. The recent popularity of high-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet, have helped this long-despised macronutrient gain some positive traction. Still, there exist many myths and misconceptions around the ketogenic diet.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
Thank you so much for this recipe! I love yogurt & started back on Keto after falling off the wagon–I discovered that it really works for me if I’m consistent), all the store-bought yogurts were so high in sugar, even the “low-carb” ones. Kroger had the only decent low-carb yogurt, but our local one has shut down (along with many others). Went online in desperation, found your recipe, had the ingredients at hand, gave it a try–wonderful! Threw some frozen blueberries in with it–even better! I won’t go back to store-bought yogurt. This fits the bill perfectly. Thanks so much!!!!
Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey! 

As mentioned above, nuts are high in fat, which makes them great for ketosis. However, this fact also makes nuts high in calories. If you’re on a ketogenic diet for weight loss, then eating a lot of nuts could make it really tough for you to lose weight. For example, 100 grams of macadamia nuts contains 718 calories! 

While calories are not the only thing that matters for weight-loss, they do still play a part, so watching your calorie intake will be important if you’re looking to lose weight by going on a ketogenic diet.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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