Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
This Greek-inspired dish has all the flavors of lemon, garlic, and oregano, giving the meat a lovely fresh taste, and the coconut yogurt dipping sauce just sets it off so well. This recipe would be a good one to try if you have friends round for a barbecue, as the flavors of the chicken are really amazing! Try to cut the chicken into even strips as that can make sure it cooks evenly on the grill.
Hi Cindy, You’d need a sweetener to make cheesecake sweet. 🙂 I always recommend following doctor’s orders, but your husband may want to clarify on the different types of sweeteners with his doctor. They are not all the same. Erythritol typically gets absorbed but not metabolized, so it works differently than most sugar alcohols that tend to cause upset stomach and GI problems. Like I said, always go by what your doctor says, but no harm in asking for clarification.
I am slightly (?) confused—in the article you use phrases such as “the low carb yogurt theory”–it can be assumed–expect approximately–The actual number of carbs has been proven– Theory, assumed, expect, and “has been proven” just seem to be at odds with each other…I’ve given up Yogurt while on a keto diet and miss it. How are these claims substantiated? Appreciate any assistance you can provide..Brian Jamieson
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Thanks for sharing! First time making cheesecake – I’m actually new to liking cheesecake. Could be because I’m pregnant and my tastebuds have changed. But I’ve been craving it lately, and I am on a strict low carb diet. This is perfect! I didn’t have raspberries, so I tried a slice this afternoon w/natural PB. Delicious! Also, I think the crust could be a great low carb crust for other desserts, like chocolate cream pie! (Hint, Hint)
Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake.
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.

Nutrition – If you eat nuts and seeds daily, you minimize your risk of nutrient deficiencies. These foods are, as already explained, nutritional powerhouses. Fat makes up a big portion of the macros in nuts, with most having over 70% of fat per measure of weight. The quality of the fats in nuts is also worth noting as most a rich in monounsaturated fatty acids [2].


In prospective cohort studies, increased nut intake has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease,[8] type 2 diabetes mellitus,[9][10] metabolic syndrome,[11] colon cancer,[12] hypertension,[13] gallstone disease,[14] diverticulitis,[15] and death from inflammatory diseases.[16] Overall, nuts and seeds are great foods to promote overall health and well-being in both the short and long-term!

When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59). 
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